NexSens EXO Sonde Bottom Platforms

The NexSens EXO sonde bottom platforms offer a turnkey solution for bottom deploying a YSI EXO multi-parameter water quality sonde.

Features

  • Integrated mooring clamp with hinged pin sized specifically for EXO sondes
  • Cage can be oriented with sensors upward or downward looking
  • Included float with 18 lb. buoyancy helps to keep platform upright
Starting At $1,695.00
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Questions & Answers
Are mooring items needed in addition to the float?

It is generally recommended to add weight to the bottom ring for extra security.

Does the platform have the ability to be recognized above water? Like a marker buoy?

Yes, a mooring line with a marker buoy can be attached to alert recreators that monitoring equipment is below.

Can a data logger be used with this platform?

The EXO water quality sondes have an integrated data logger with battery pack for unattended monitoring with periodic data upload. If real-time data is required, we recommend cabling the sonde to a surface CB-Series data buoy with wireless transmitter.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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NexSens EXO Sonde Bottom Platforms
BP-EXO1
EXO1 sonde bottom platform with clamps
$1,695.00
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NexSens EXO Sonde Bottom Platforms
BP-EXO2
EXO2/EXO3 sonde bottom platform with clamps
$1,695.00
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