SDL-V2

NexSens SDL V2 Submersible Data Loggers

NexSens SDL V2 Submersible Data Loggers

Description

The SDL V2 Submersible Data Logger is a rugged, self-powered data logging system with optional cellular, satellite, or radio communications.

Features

  • Three sensor ports for connection to industry-standard digital sensor interfaces
  • Powered by (16) D-cell alkaline batteries or optional solar power pack
  • Withstands extreme wave action, drops, floods, and periodic & long-term deployment underwater
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$2,495.00
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Details

The SDL V2 Submersible Data Logger is a rugged, self-powered remote data logging system for deploying environmental sensors in lakes, streams, rivers, wetlands, coastal waters, sewers, and culverts without fear of accidental flooding. The system is configured with three sensor ports for connection to industry-standard digital interfaces including RS-485 and SDI-12. Additional sensor inputs are available through the use of adapters. Each sensor port offers a UW receptacle with double O-ring seal for a reliable waterproof connection. Unlike many data loggers, the SDL V2 is truly submersible. The housing and battery compartment are completely sealed and waterproof.

When it comes to field ruggedness, the NexSens SDL V2 is in a class of its own. The housing is constructed of impact-resistant PVC and includes two elastomer bumpers for long-term deployment in close-fitting pipes and buoy ports. Internal circuit boards and communication modules are shock mounted and all access ports incorporate redundant sealing. The SDL V2 withstands extreme wave action, drops, floods, periodic & long-term deployment underwater, and more. When fitted for wireless remote communication, the radio, cellular, and satellite antennas are also waterproof.

The SDL V2 can be powered autonomously by sixteen D-cell alkaline batteries. Optional solar power kits provide long-term continuous operation and solar charging. Common sensor connections include multi-parameter sondes, water quality sensors, temperature strings, Doppler velocity meters, water level sensors, and weather stations. Optional integrated cellular or satellite telemetry modules offer real-time remote communications via the WQData LIVE web datacenter. There, data is presented on a fully-featured and easy-to-use dashboard. Other features include automated reports, alarms, push notifications and much more.

Notable Specifications:
  • Ports: (3) UW8 ports for sensor connection; (1) UW6 port for host connection and external power
  • Host Interface: (1) RS-485 (half duplex)
  • Sensor Interface: (1) RS-485 (half duplex); (1) SDI-12; Optional RS-232  (via smart RS-232 to RS-485 adapter); Optional analog (via mV to RS-485 adapter)
  • Sensor Power: (1) Switched 5 VDC, (1) Fulltime  12 VDC, (2) Switched 12 VDC
  • Sensor Protocols: Modbus RTU; NMEA 0183; SDI-12; GSI (via custom script)
  • Host Protocols: Modbus RTU; Terminal command interface
  • Log Interval: 1 minute to 24 hours; supports different intervals for different sensors concurrently
  • Real Time Clock (RTC): <30sec/month drift; Auto-sync weekly; Internal backup battery
  • Built-In Sensors: Temperature (-40 to 85°C, 0.01°C resolution, ±2°C accuracy from -20 to 85C); Pressure (300 to 1100 mbar, 0.016 mbar resolution, ±4 mbar accuracy from -20 to 85C); Humidity (0-100%, 0.04% resolution, ±5% accuracy from 5 to 95% RH); Battery voltage; Current draw
  • Internal Memory: 256MB microSD card (expandable up to 32GB)
  • Internal Power: (16) D-cell alkaline batteries
  • External Power Requirements: 5-24 VDC ±5% (Overcurrent and Reverse polarity protection)
  • Typical Current Draw (@12V): Low power sleep: 160uA; Active: 40mA; Cellular transmitting: 300 mA; Radio transmitting: 215mA; Iridium transmitting: 170mA
  • Maximum Depth: 200 ft.
  • Temperature Range: -40 to +85°C
  • Dimensions: 5.5" (13.97 cm) diameter; 16.50" (46.36 cm) length (antenna length varies by model)
  • Weight: 11.0 lbs without batteries; 16.6 lbs with batteries
  • Remote Communication: Cellular; License-free 900MHz and 2.4GHz radio; Iridium satellite
  • Supported Cellular Modems: 2G/3G international; 3G North American; 4G LTE North American; LTE-M North America; (future LTE-M1 North America; NB-IoT Europe)
  • Certified Cellular Carriers: AT&T, Verizon
  • Radio Range (Line of Sight): Low power: 2 miles; High power: 28 miles; Extended power: 60 miles
  • Radio Topology: Point-to-Point; Star; Mesh
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens SDL V2 Submersible Data Loggers SDL-V2 SDL V2 submersible data logger
$2495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens SDL V2 Submersible Data Loggers SDL-V2-C-VZ4G SDL V2 submersible data logger with Verizon 4G LTE cellular telemetry
$2995.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens SDL V2 Submersible Data Loggers SDL-V2-C-AT4G SDL V2 submersible data logger with AT&T 4G LTE cellular telemetry
$2995.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens Verizon Cellular Data Service VZ-25MB-M Verizon cellular data service with 25 MB monthly allowance & static IP address, priced per month
$30.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens Verizon Cellular Data Service VZ-25MB-Y Verizon cellular data service with 25 MB monthly allowance & static IP address, priced per year
$360.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens SDL V2 Submersible Antenna Cap SDL-CAP SDL V2 submersible antenna cap
$295.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens X2/V2 Direct Connect USB PC Cable UW6-USB-485P Direct connect USB PC cable, X2/V2
$145.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens UW Cable Connectorization UW-CON UW plug connectorization of sensor cable assembly
$195.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens CB-50 Data Buoy CB-50 Data buoy with polymer-coated foam hull, 50 lb. buoyancy
$1495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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