NexSens X2-CBMC Buoy-Mounted Data Logger

The X2-CBMC is an offshore-ready wireless data logger housed inside a waterproof enclosure with wet-mate connectors for integration with NexSens' CB-Series data buoys.

Features

  • MCIL/MCBH wet-mateable sensor and power ports
  • Cellular or Iridium satellite telemetry options
  • Optional WQData LIVE web datacenter for instant access on any web browser
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NexSens X2-CBMC Buoy-Mounted Data Logger

The NexSens X2-CBMC is an all-in-one environmental data logger specifically designed for offshore use with a NexSens CB-Series data buoy. It automatically recognizes sensors and sends data to the web via cellular or Iridium satellite telemetry. The X2-CBMC includes five sensor ports that are compatible with most environmental sensor protocols including SDI-12, RS-232 and RS-485. All connections are made using MCIL/MCBH wet-mate connectors, and the built-in sensor library automatically facilitates setup and configuration. Sensor data is recorded on common or independent schedules.

The X2-CBMC is powered from the CB-Series buoy’s solar rechargeable battery reserve. Advanced power management combined with ultra-low sleep and run currents extend battery life and reduce the need for larger buoy and solar charging systems. The X2-CBMC monitors itself while collecting environmental data. Internal temperature, humidity, voltages and currents are constantly recorded. Failure alerts can be sent automatically to a predefined list of contacts.

The X2-CBMC integrates the sensor ports, solar panel connector, pressure relief valve, and wireless antenna all on the data well lid for quick installation on CB-Series data buoys. Integrated cellular or Iridium satellite telemetry modules offer real-time remote communications via the WQData LIVE web datacenter. There, data is presented on a fully-featured and easy-to-use dashboard. Other features include automated reports, alarms, push notifications and much more.

Mount: CB-Series buoy data well plate
Material: 316 stainless steel plate with PVC body
Weight: 10.5 lbs.
Dimensions: 13.5" Diameter, 4.4" Height (6" with cell antenna; 8.125" with Iridium antenna)
Power Requirements
: 5-16 VDC +/-5% (Reverse polarity protected)
Current Draw (Typical @ 12VDC): Low power sleep: 350uA; Active: 45mA; Cellular transmitting: 300mA; Iridium satellite transmitting: 170mA
Peak Current: Power supply must be able to sustain a 500mA 1-second peak current (@ 12V)
Operating Temperature: -20C to 70°C
Rating: IP67
User Interface: RS-485 direct to CONNECT Software, WQData LIVE Web Datacenter, buzzer indicator
Data Logging: 256MB microSD card (expandable up to 4GB)
Data Processing: Parameter level polynomial equation adjustment; Basic & Burst Averaging (min, max, standard deviation, and raw data available)
Real Time Clock (RTC): <30sec/month drift1; Auto-sync weekly2; Internal backup battery
Log Interval: User configurable from 1 minute (10 minute default)3; Independent interval per sensor
Transmission Trigger: Time-based; Selective parameter upload option
Sensor Interfaces: SDI-12, RS-232 (3 Channels), RS485
Sensor Power: (3) independent switches from input supply4,5
Built-in Sensors: Temperature (-40C to 85C, 0.1C resolution, ±0.3C accuracy); Humidity (0% to 100%, 0.1% resolution, ±4% accuracy from 5 to 95% RH & -20 to 70C); Battery voltage; System & sensor current
Sensor Ports: (5) MCBH-8-MP for Sensor Interface (RS-232, RS-485, SDI-12, Switched Power, GND)6
Power Port: (1) MCBH-6-FS for Power and Communication (12V Solar In, Power Switch, RS-485 Host, GND)
Telemetry Options: 4G LTE cellular, CAT-M1 cellular, Iridium satellite
Antenna Port: Type N female

Notes
1Assumes 25ºC operating temperature
2Requires the X2 to be connected to the internet
3Minimum log interval dependent on sensor limitations and processing time
4Cumulative concurrent current limit of all three channels is 2A
5Logger power supply must be able to support current requirements of sensors
6P0A & P0B share a single RS-232 and power channel. P1A & P1B share a single RS-232 and power channel.

  • (1) X2-CBMC buoy-mounted data logger
  • (5) Sensor port dummy plugs
  • (1) Power port dummy plug
  • (1) Quick start guide
  • (1) Wireless antenna (installed on telemetry units only)
Questions & Answers
What is the difference between the X2-CBMC and the X2-CB?
The X2-CBMC data logger is designed for offshore marine applications and difficult freshwater environments, while the X2-CB data logger is meant for lakes and other inland bodies of water. The X2-CBMC uses MCBH/MCIL wet-mate sensor/power connectors and a pressure relief valve for battery outgassing compared with UW plug/receptacle connectors and a passive battery vent on the X2-CB.
Can I have different measurement intervals for the sensors?
The X2-CBMC (and all X2 data loggers) allows each sensor to have its own measurement interval if desired. Alternatively all sensors can measure at the same interval.
How can I connect my existing sensor to an X2-CBMC data logger?
Customers can send in sensor cables to be terminated with an 8-pin female wet mate connector (PN# MCIL-8-FS-X). Alternatively, NexSens can provide pigtail cables terminating in bare wires for the customer to splice with their existing cables (PN# MCIL-8-FS-1).
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NexSens X2-CBMC Buoy-Mounted Data Logger
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X2-CBMC buoy-mounted data logger with MCBH connectors
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