NexSens X2-SDLMC Submersible Data Logger

The X2-SDLMC Submersible Data Logger is a rugged, self-powered remote data logging system specifically designed for offshore use without fear of accidental flooding.

Features

  • Wet-mateable sensor and power ports with integrated wireless communications
  • Optimized for use with CB-25 data buoy for monitoring water or atmospheric conditions
  • Withstands extreme wave action, floods, and periodic & long-term deployment underwater
Your Price Call
Stock Check Availability  
NexSens X2-SDLMC Submersible Data Logger

The X2-SDLMC Submersible Data Logger is a rugged, self-powered remote data logging system specifically designed for offshore use without fear of accidental flooding. The system is configured with two sensor ports for connection to industry-standard digital interfaces including RS-485, RS-232 and SDI-12. Additional sensor inputs are available through the use of port splitters and adapters. All connections are made using MCIL/MCBH wet-mate connectors, and the built-in sensor library automatically facilitates setup and configuration. Sensor data is recorded on common or independent schedules.

Unlike many data loggers, the X2-SDLMC is truly submersible. The housing and battery compartment are completely sealed and waterproof. Internal circuit boards and communication modules are shock mounted, and all access ports incorporate redundant sealing. The X2-SDLMC withstands extreme wave action, floods, periodic & long-term deployment underwater, and more. When fitted for wireless remote communication, the cellular and satellite antennas are also waterproof.

The X2-SDLMC can be powered by internal SLA battery or external 5-16 VDC power. The internal SLA battery is intended for use with the CB-25 data buoy for continuous power via solar charging. Common sensor connections include multi-parameter sondes, water quality sensors, temperature strings, Doppler velocity meters, water level sensors, and weather stations. Optional integrated cellular or satellite telemetry modules offer real-time remote communications via the WQData LIVE web datacenter. There, data is presented on a fully-featured and easy-to-use dashboard. Other features include automated reports, alarms, push notifications and much more.

Material: Housing: PVC; Connectors: Type 316 SS, neoprene; Pressure valve: Anodized aluminum
Weight: 5.0 lbs. without batteries; 8.3 lbs. with SLA battery pack
Dimensions: 5.5” (13.97 cm) diameter; 15.0” height (38.10 cm)
Internal Power: 6 A-Hr SLA battery, 12 VDC
External Power Requirements: 5-16 VDC ±5% (Reverse polarity protected)
Current Draw (Typical @ 12VDC): Low power sleep: 350uA; Active: 45mA; Cellular transmitting: 300mA; Iridium satellite transmitting: 170mA
Peak Current: Power supply must be able to sustain a 500mA 1-second peak current (@ 12V)
Operating Temperature: -20 to 70°C
Rating: 100m depth rating (standalone); 10m depth rating (with telemetry)
User Interface: RS-485 direct to CONNECT Software, WQDatalive Web Datacenter
Data Logging: 256MB microSD card (expandable up to 4GB)
Data Processing: Parameter level polynomial equation adjustment; Basic & burst averaging (min, max, standard deviation, and raw data available)
Real Time Clock (RTC): <30sec/month drift1; Auto-sync weekly2; Internal backup battery
Log Interval: User configurable from 1 minute (10 minute default)3; Unique interval per sensor
Transmission Trigger: Time-based; Selective parameter upload option
Sensor Interfaces: SDI-12, RS-232 (2 channels), RS-485
Sensor Power: (2) independent switches from input supply4,5
Built-in Sensors: Temperature (-40 to 85°C, 0.1°C resolution, ±3°C accuracy); Humidity (0-100%, 0.1% resolution, ±4% accuracy from 5-95% RH & -20 to 70°C); Battery voltage; System & sensor current
Sensor Ports: (2) MCBH-8-MP for sensor interface (RS-232, RS-485, SDI-12, Switched Power, GND)
Power Port: (1) MCBH-6-FS for power and communication (12V Solar In, Power Switch, RS-485 Host, GND)
Telemetry Options: 4G LTE cellular, CAT-M1 cellular, Iridium satellite
Antenna Port: Type N female

1Assumes 25ºC operating temperature
2Requires the X2-SDLMC to be connected to the internet
3Minimum log interval dependent on sensor limitations and processing time
4Cumulative concurrent current limit of all three channels is 2A
5Logger power supply must be able to support current requirements of sensors

Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

Select Options

  Products 0 Item Selected
Image
Part #
Description
Price
Stock
Quantity
NexSens X2-SDLMC Submersible Data Logger
X2-SDLMC
X2-SDLMC submersible data logger
Request Quote
Check Availability  
NexSens X2-SDLMC Submersible Data Logger
X2-SDLMC-C-2G3G
X2-SDLMC submersible data logger with 2G/3G cellular telemetry
Request Quote
Check Availability  
NexSens X2-SDLMC Submersible Data Logger
X2-SDLMC-C-NA4G
X2-SDLMC submersible data logger with North American 4G LTE cellular telemetry
Request Quote
Check Availability  
NexSens X2-SDLMC Submersible Data Logger
X2-SDLMC-C-CATM
X2-SDLMC submersible data logger with CAT-M1/NB2 LTE cellular telemetry
Request Quote
Check Availability  
NexSens X2-SDLMC Submersible Data Logger
X2-SDLMC-I
X2-SDLMC submersible data logger with Iridium satellite telemetry
Request Quote
Check Availability  
  Accessories 0 Item Selected
Notice: At least 1 product is not available to purchase online
×
Multiple Products

have been added to your cart

There are items in your cart.

Cart Subtotal: $xxx.xx

Go to Checkout

In The News

Coastal Restoration in Rhode Island

Anyone who has spent a significant amount of time in nature can likely relate to feeling connected and defensive toward protecting the environment. Heather Kinney, a coastal restoration scientist with The Nature Conservancy in Rhode Island, knows this feeling well, having felt a deep connection to nature her entire life. “I have always had a deep love for nature and the environment, particularly being out on the water and being drawn to the ocean, as cliché as that sounds,” says Kinney. Being so close to nature her entire life led Kinney to pursue a career in conservation and restoration. “You want to protect what you love, and I think that once I fell in love with it- it was something that I wanted to be able to pursue professionally,” she explains.

Read More

Not So Quiet Polar Night: Arctic Creatures Found to be Active During Dark Part of the Year

Most people need little more than a comfortable pillow, a blanket, and a dark room to drift off into a multi-hour snooze. Many researchers assumed that once plunged into darkness for about half the year during the polar night, most polar creatures would do the same: fall asleep and take a big nap for as long as the darkness lasted. But Jon Cohen, associate professor of marine sciences, school of marine science and policy, in the College of Earth, Ocean, and the Environment at the University of Delaware, wondered if that was true. Despite the technical challenges of monitoring biota in very low light conditions, Cohen and his team were determined to find out if krill, copepods, and other creatures were dozing off in the dark or seeking out prey, light, and each other.

Read More

Orange Stream Dreams: Monitoring Acid Mine Drainage and Watershed Health

Not many young people pondering careers come up with the words “acid mine drainage.” But Jen Bowman, Director of Environmental Programs at the Voinovich School at Ohio University, could not help but be fascinated by what she saw during her days as an Ohio University student collecting field samples. “My interest in acid mine drainage, and how it affects watersheds, goes way back to my undergraduate days,” she explains. “We saw firsthand how streams could be impacted by drainage from abandoned mines. Sometimes streams had such severe problems they turned orange. It was hard not to be struck by that. I was drawn in to the many associated challenges, keeping watersheds clean, and improving stream health.

Read More