EFC-A1

Polyform A-Style Fender Covers

Polyform A-Style Fender Covers

Description

The Polyform Fender Covers is built to last for many years to protect fenders.

Features

  • Hand-crafted with heavy duty polyester fabric for durability
  • Sun resistant, abrasion resistant and water resistant
  • Custom fit for a tailored look with quick and easy installation
List Price
$74.99
Your Price
$51.29
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Protect your fenders with Polyform's elite fender covers.

Fender covers should be as tough as the fenders they protect. That was our criteria used in developing the Elite Fender Cover series. Polyform uses a premium grade polyester yarn that is resistant to abrasion and UV exposure. Additionally, it resists water absorption better than other materials, keeping fenders manageably light when wet. The cover is woven on a special knitting machine that produces a seamless tube, meaning no seams to split. This method allows for a heavier, stronger yarn content resulting in a great fender cover that is built to last for many years, not just a season.

Features:

  • Washable
  • Custom fit for a tailored look
  • A tough 1/4" line drawstring closure, an upgrade from the brittle elastic you find on many fender covers

 

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Polyform A-Style Fender Covers EFC-A1 Fender cover for A-1 ball style, black
$51.29
In Stock
Polyform A-Style Fender Covers EFC-A2 Fender cover for A-2 ball style, black
$61.57
In Stock
Polyform A-Style Fender Covers EFC-A3 Fender cover for A-3 ball style, black
$74.41
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Polyform A-Style Fender Covers EFC-A4 Fender cover for A-4, black
$87.61
In Stock
Polyform A-Style Fender Covers EFC-A5 Fender cover for A-5, black
$128.91
In Stock
Polyform A-Style Fender Covers EFC-A6 Fender cover for A-6, black
$162.49
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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