RainWise CC-3000 Data Logger & Computer Interface

The CC-3000 is the next generation data logger and computer interface, offering enhanced connectivity, storage capacity and features.

Features

  • Fast USB 2.0 interface (RS-232 version also available)
  • Integrated radio receiver
  • Free software for Windows computers
List Price $395.00
Your Price $355.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RainWise CC-3000 Data Logger & Computer Interface802-0002 CC-3000 data logger & computer interface with USB, 2.4 GHz
$355.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise CC-3000 Data Logger & Computer Interface 802-0005 CC-3000 data logger & computer interface with RS-232, 2.4 GHz
$355.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise CC-3000 Data Logger & Computer Interface 802-0010 CC-3000 data logger & computer interface with Modbus, 2.4 GHz
$355.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise CC-3000 Data Logger & Computer Interface
802-0002
CC-3000 data logger & computer interface with USB, 2.4 GHz
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$355.50
RainWise CC-3000 Data Logger & Computer Interface
802-0005
CC-3000 data logger & computer interface with RS-232, 2.4 GHz
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$355.50
RainWise CC-3000 Data Logger & Computer Interface
802-0010
CC-3000 data logger & computer interface with Modbus, 2.4 GHz
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$355.50
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RainWise MK-III Wireless Weather Stations 800-0010 MK-III weather station with wind speed & direction, temperature, humidity & pressure; 2.4 GHz (1600m) wireless communication
$805.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise MK-III Wireless Weather Stations 800-0009 MK-III weather station with wind speed & direction, temperature, humidity, pressure & rainfall; 2.4 GHz (1600m) wireless communication
$895.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise MK-III Wireless Weather Stations 800-0007 MK-III weather station with wind speed & direction, temperature, humidity, pressure, rainfall, solar radiation & leaf wetness; 2.4 GHz (1600m) wireless communication
$1,300.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
MK-III weather station with wind speed & direction, temperature, humidity & pressure; 2.4 GHz (1600m) wireless communication
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$805.50
RainWise MK-III Wireless Weather Stations
800-0009
MK-III weather station with wind speed & direction, temperature, humidity, pressure & rainfall; 2.4 GHz (1600m) wireless communication
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$895.50
RainWise MK-III Wireless Weather Stations
800-0007
MK-III weather station with wind speed & direction, temperature, humidity, pressure, rainfall, solar radiation & leaf wetness; 2.4 GHz (1600m) wireless communication
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$1,300.50

Free Software:
Each CC-3000 is shipped with a free version of Weatherview32 V8 Home Edition. Upgrades are available.  Weathersnoop for Mac is sold separately.

Integrated Radio Receiver:
Unlike the previous interface, the LR radio receiver is build right into the unit. This means less wires and a cleaner desk. A power cable and USB cable are all that are required. The new switching power supply is smaller and more efficient.
 
Fast USB or RS-232:
The CC-3000 is normally shipped with a USB interface. An RS-232 version is available for applications that require serial connections like cellular and satellite modems. The baud rate has been boosted from 9600 to 115,200. Even with extra memory download times are dramatically reduced. USB drivers are provided for Windows, Mac and Linux.
 
Flash Memory:
Memory has been increased from 32K to 2MB. The 32K was RAM based which meant if you lost power you lost your data. This is not the case with flash, your data is non-volatile and will not be destroyed when power is lost. The data stored in memory is compressed so the 2MB will allow for long intervals between downloads. With a 49834 record capacity the CC-3000 will log for over 11 months at a 10 minute logging interval. The capacity will vary depending selected sensors. A base record is 42 bytes in length.
 
NiMH Battery Backup:
The CC-3000 now uses NiMH battery backup. These batteries are much easier to get than NiCAD and have substantially more capacity. Fully charged batteries will keep the CC-3000 running for more than 24 hours. The new case includes a battery compartment which makes installing the four batteries very easy.
 
Inside Temperature:
A thermistor based temperature sensor is built into the interface.  This provides inside temperature which can be very useful for freeze alarms in vacation homes.
 
High Speed Processor:
The performance of the primary processor has been increased while also reducing power consumption. The increased performance allows for faster communications and more features.
 
Software Updates:
The new CPU can be reprogrammed via the USB or RS-232 interface. This means that updates can be quickly and easily applied by the user. This also allows for multiple software programs that use the same hardware. Rainwise can now offer custom software designed for specific tasks. Contact us if you have a specific requirement.
 
English and Metric Units:
The original interface was only available in English units. Metric was achieved by having a PC application convert the data. The CC-3000 has user selectable units.
 
New Command Protocol:
The new command protocol was designed to offer greater flexibility, be more user friendly and easier for software developers to use. The full protocol and command list are supplied are available in the CC-3000 instruction manual.
 
Daylight Savings:
Daylight savings is now supported. The dates, times and shift are user selectable. This allows the CC-3000 to be used in any country around the world.
 
Expansion Port:
In preparation for future functionality the CC-3000 is equipped with an expansion port. This connector will allow for future digital and analog sensors.

Questions & Answers
No Questions
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