805-1019

RainWise PortLog Portable Weather Station

RainWise PortLog Portable Weather Station

Description

The PortLog is a compact rugged industrial grade data logging weather station designed for quick deployment and operation in harsh conditions.

Features

  • Data storage for up to 9-months at 1-hour logging rate
  • 3-watt solar panel and 4 A-hr sealed lead acid battery
  • Equipment is backed by 5-year warranty
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List Price
$3295.00
Your Price
$2,965.50
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

The PortLog is a compact rugged industrial grade data logging weather station which measures temperature, wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, relative humidity, dew point, solar radiation and rainfall. The unit is fully assembled and can be quickly deployed. The large 3-Watt solar panel and 5AH sealed lead acid battery ensure reliable operation in the harshest conditions.

The PortLog communicates directly to a PC via an RS232 serial port. During the data logging time interval, the wind speed and wind direction are averaged. The maximum wind speed is also captured and the solar energy calculated. All data is saved to non-volatile RAM. Selectable units are English and Metric with wind speed also recorded in Knots and Meters per Second. Solar Radiation is in SI units only.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
RainWise PortLog Portable Weather Station 805-1019 PortLog portable weather station with wind speed & direction, temperature, humidity, pressure, rainfall & solar radiation; no tripod or carrying case
$2965.50
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
RainWise PortLog Portable Weather Station 805-1018 PortLog portable weather station with wind speed & direction, temperature, humidity, pressure, rainfall & solar radiation; includes tripod & carrying case
$3595.50
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens RS-232 to USB Adapter RS232-USB RS-232 to USB adapter
$39.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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