RainWise Radio Repeater

The radio repeater improves signal quality between the MK-lll 2.4 GHz weather station and receiving devices in situations where direct line-of-site is not possible.

Features

  • Can be used to obtain a continuous signal around corners
  • Repeater must be within reach of electrical outlet
  • Multiple repeaters can be used if necessary
List Price $229.00
Your Price $206.10
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RainWise Radio Repeater800-1165 Radio repeater, 2.4 GHz
$206.10
Usually ships in 3-5 days

The MK-III-LR Repeater has a maximum range of 1 mile clear line-of-sight between itself and the transmitting device, and again between itself and the receiving device. The Repeater is a hard-wired unit and must be located in a place that is weatherproof, within reach of an electrical outlet, and free from obstructions to communications.  Things that may reduce or disable communications are:

  • Metal roofing or siding
  • Brick, stone or cement structures
  • Trees or dense foliage
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