WQ301-R

Used Global Water WQ301 Conductivity Sensor

Used Global Water WQ301 Conductivity Sensor

Description

Global Water's WQ301 conductivity sensor is a rugged and reliable water conductivity measuring device.

Features

  • Measure conductivity at any depth
  • Fully encapsulated electronics in stainless steel housing
  • 4-20 mA output
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$391.00
In Stock

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Details

Global Water’s WQ301 Conductivity Sensor is a rugged and reliable water conductivity measuring device. The WQ301 offers a rapid and non-destructive way to measure the ion content in a solution. The conductivity sensor is molded to 25' of marine grade cable. The conductivity sensor’s output is 4-20 mA with a three wire configuration. The unit’s electronics are completely encapsulated in marine grade epoxy within a stainless steel housing.

Notable Specifications:
  • Output: 4-20 mA
  • Range: 0 to 10,000 μS
  • Accuracy: 1% full scale
  • Maximum Pressure: 50 psi
  • Operating Voltage: 12 VDC (± 5%)
  • Current Draw: 0.8 mA plus sensor output
  • Warm-up Time: 3 seconds minimum
  • Operating Temperature: -40° to +55°C
  • Temperature Compensation: 2% per °C
  • Size of Probe Open Water: 1" dia. x 12" long (3.175cm dia. x 30.5cm) Online: 2.5" dia. x 15.5" long (6.35cm dia. x 39.4cm)
  • Weight Open Water: 8 oz (227 g) Online: 22 oz (624 g)
  • Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
    Used Global Water WQ301 Conductivity Sensor WQ301-R Used WQ301B conductivity sensor with 0-10,000 uS range, 25 ft. cable
    $391.00
    In Stock

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