Rickly DH-48 Depth Integrated Sediment Sampler

The DH-48 a lightweight sampler for collection of suspended sediment samples where wading rod suspension is used.

Features

  • 13" streamlined aluminum casting partially encloses a pint sample container
  • Sampler is supplied with one 1/4" calibrated yellow nylon nozzle
  • Wading rod & bottles are sold separately (see accessories)
Your Price $295.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Rickly
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Rickly DH-48 Depth Integrated Sediment Sampler401-001 DH-48 depth integrated sediment sampler
$295.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Rickly Standard 3 ft. Wading Rod with Handle 405-021 Wading rod with handle, 3 ft.
$43.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Standard 3 ft. Wading Rod Extension 405-022 Wading rod extension, 3 ft.
$41.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Plastic Sampler Containers 405-010 Plastic sampler containers, case of 24
$35.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
The DH-48 a lightweight sampler for collection of suspended sediment samples where wading rod suspension is used. The sampler consists of a 13" streamlined aluminum casting which partially encloses a pint sample container.

The sampler weighs 4.5 pounds including the sample container and attaches to a standard 1/2" threaded wading rod for suspending in the water. The wading rod is available in 3 foot sections. The wading sampler is supplied with one 1/4" calibrated yellow nylon nozzle.

In the sampling operation, the intake nozzle is orientated into the current and held in a horizontal position while the sample is lowered at a uniform rate from the water surface to the bottom of the stream, instantly reversed, and then raised again to the water surface at a uniform rate. The sampler continues to take its sample throughout the time of submergence.
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