YOUNG 3-Cup Anemometer

The YOUNG 12102 3-Cup Anemometer is a traditional type, sensitive sensor for horizontal wind measurement.

Features

  • Sensitive DC generator outputs horizontal wind speed
  • Constructed with lightweight and UV resistant plastic cups
  • Mounting bracket installs on standard 1 inch pipe
Your Price $734.00
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The RM Young 12102 3-Cup Anemometer is a traditional type, sensitive sensor for horizontal wind measurement. The 3-Cup assembly is constructed with lightweight and UV resistant plastic cups. Housings are precision machined aluminum. A sensitive DC generator outputs wind speed. The anemometer mounting bracket installs on standard 1 inch pipe.
  • Wind Speed: 0-60 m/s (130 mph)
  • Threshold: 0.5 m/s (1.1 mph)
  • Wind Speed Signal: DC voltage linearly proportional to wind speed
  • Dimensions: 32 cm (12.5 in) H x 17 cm (6.7 in) dia.
  • Mounting: Standard 1 inch pipe
  • Weight: 1.4 kg (3.1 lb)
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 kg (4 lb)
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YOUNG 3-Cup Anemometer
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3-Cup anemometer
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