YOUNG Portable Tripod

The YOUNG 18940 Portable Tripod is a convenient stand for temporary installation of meteorological sensors.

Features

  • Constructed of corrosion resistant materials
  • Extendable top section with mounting post that fits RM Young wind sensors
  • For extra stability, Model 18943 Guy Wire Assembly may be used
Your Price $496.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG Portable Tripod18940 Portable tripod
$496.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG Portable Tripod
18940
Portable tripod
Drop ships from manufacturer
$496.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG Guy Wire Assembly 18943 Guy wire assembly for portable tripod
$220.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
NexSens Weather Sensor Tripod Adapter Mount 18940-M Mounting adapter for attaching Vaisala WXT-Series weather sensor to RM Young 18940 tripod
$69.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YOUNG Guy Wire Assembly
18943
Guy wire assembly for portable tripod
Drop ships from manufacturer
$220.00
Mounting adapter for attaching Vaisala WXT-Series weather sensor to RM Young 18940 tripod
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$69.00
Constructed of corrosion resistant materials, the RM Young 18940 is surprisingly sturdy for its light weight. The tripod features an extendable top section with mounting post that fits Young wind sensors. One leg is articulated for leveling on uneven surfaces. For extra stability, Model 18943 Guy Wire Assembly may be used.
  • Height: Adjustable 1.7m (66") to 2.9m (114")
  • Base: Legs extend 76cm (30") maximum from center
  • Collapsed Size: 18cm (7") diameter x 155cm (61") L
  • Weight: 4.1 kg (9 lb)
  • Shipping Weight: 5.3 kg (12 lb)
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