YOUNG Serial Interface

The YOUNG 32400 Serial Interface greatly simplifies connection of meteorological sensors to recording electronics with serial inputs.

Features

  • Data can be carried over great distances using a minimum number of conductors
  • Digital signal is more resistant to electrical interference and errors from line losses
  • Each model is supplied in a weather-resistant enclosure
Your Price $578.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG Serial Interface32400 Serial interface
$578.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG Serial Interface
32400
Serial interface
Drop ships from manufacturer
$578.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RM Young Cables 18446 Sensor cable, 5 conductor shielded, 22 AWG, per ft.
$0.92
Drop ships from manufacturer
RM Young Cables
18446
Sensor cable, 5 conductor shielded, 22 AWG, per ft.
Drop ships from manufacturer
$0.92
For applications not requiring a compass, RM Young 32400 Serial Interface offers the benefits of serial output without the compass circuitry. The serial interface greatly simplifies connection of meteorological sensors to recording electronics with serial inputs. By transmitting the signal in serial form, sensor data can be carried over great distances using a minimum number of conductors. The digital signal is more resistant to electrical interference and errors from line losses. Model 32400 is supplied in a weather-resistant enclosure and has a convenient clamp for attachment to round pipe.
  • Size: 4.75" (12cm) H x 2.87" (7.3cm) W x 2.12" (5.3cm) D
  • Resolution: 1 degree azimuth
  • Accuracy: +/-2 degrees RMS
  • Inputs: YOUNG wind sensors 2 channels, 0-1000 mV 2 channels, 0-5000 mV
  • Outputs: Serial RS232/RS485
  • Selectable formats: ASCII Text, NMEA, RMYT compatible with 06201 display
  • Operating Temperature: -50 C to +50 C
  • Power: 10 to 30 VDC, 30 mA
  • Mounting: 1" IPS (1.34" actual diameter)
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