YOUNG Aspirated Radiation Shields

The YOUNG 43502 aspirated radiation shield provides maximum sensor protection from incoming short wave radiation and outgoing long wave radiation.

Features

  • Shield employs a triple-walled intake tube and multiple canopy shades
  • Continuous duty blower draws ambient air through the intake tubes and across the sensor
  • Plastic materials provide high reflectivity, low conductivity, and maximum weatherability
Your Price $454.00
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YOUNG
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG Aspirated Radiation Shields43502 Compact aspirated radiation shield, 115/230 VAC adapter
$454.00
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RM Young Cables 18446 Sensor cable, 5 conductor shielded, 22 AWG, per ft.
$0.90
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YOUNG Temperature Sensors 41342 Platinum temperature probe, 4-wire RTD
$190.00
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RM Young 41342LC Temperature Sensor 41342LC Platinum temperature probe, degrees Celsius, 4-20 mA
$472.00
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RM Young 41342LF Temperature Sensor 41342LF Platinum temperature probe, degrees Fahrenheit, 4-20 mA
$472.00
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RM Young 41342VC Temperature Sensor 41342VC Platinum temperature probe, degrees Celsius, 0-1 V
$472.00
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RM Young 41342VF Temperature Sensor 41342VF Platinum temperature probe, degrees Fahrenheit, 0-1 V
$472.00
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YOUNG Humidity & Temperature Sensors 41382VC Relative humidity & temperature probe, degrees Celsius, 0-1 V
$840.00
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RM Young 41382VF Temperature/RH Sensor 41382VF Relative humidity & temperature probe, degrees Fahrenheit, 0-1 V
$840.00
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The RM Young 43502 shield employs a triple-walled intake tube and multiple canopy shades to isolate the sensor from precipitation and solar radiation. A continuous duty blower draws ambient air through the intake tubes and across the sensor, minimizing radiation errors. Compact shield components reduce radiation absorption and improve aspiration efficiency. Specially selected plastic materials provide high reflectivity, low conductivity, and maximum weatherability.

The versatile DC blower is designed for continuous duty of more than 80,000 hours (9 years) at 25 degrees C (77 degrees F). Brushless electronic commutation is achieved using dependable solid state circuitry.
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