YOUNG Pressure Port

The YOUNG 61002 pressure port minimizes dynamic pressure errors due to wind.

Features

  • Dynamic Pressure Error: 0.5 hPa maximum @ 20 m/s
  • Dimensions: 11.5 cm (4.5 in) H x 13 cm (5.1 in) Dia.
  • Mounting: Offset bracket with U-bolt for 25 - 50 mm (1-2 in) pipe
Your Price $166.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG Pressure Port61002 Pressure port with offset bracket
$166.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG Pressure Port
61002
Pressure port with offset bracket
Drop ships from manufacturer
$166.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG Barometric Pressure Sensors 61402V Barometric pressure sensor, 0-5 VDC
$656.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
RM Young 61360 Weatherproof Enclosure 61360 Weatherproof enclosure for 61302 barometers
$116.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Barometric pressure sensor, 0-5 VDC
Drop ships from manufacturer
$656.00
RM Young 61360 Weatherproof Enclosure
61360
Weatherproof enclosure for 61302 barometers
Drop ships from manufacturer
$116.00
Ambient wind of 20 meters per second blowing over a typical barometer inlet tube can cause pressure errors as high as 3 hPa. The RM Young 61002 pressure port minimizes these errors.
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

UNC's industry-standard water quality profiling platforms get upgrade

The University of North Carolina Institute Of Marine Sciences has a history with profiling platforms. UNC engineers and scientists have been building the research floaters for 10 years in a lab run by in Rick Luettich , director of the institute. UNC scientists and engineers developed their own autonomous vertical profilers to take water quality readings throughout the water column.  They have three profilers  placed in the New and Neuse rivers. The profilers are designed to drop a payload of sensors to an allotted depth at set time intervals. Instruments attached take readings continuously on the way down and up. Data collected by the profilers has been used to study water related issues such as infectious disease and sediment suspension.

Read More

USGS weather station network monitors Arctic Alaska's climate

When the U.S. Geological Survey began building their climate and permafrost monitoring network in Arctic Alaska in 1998, there wasn't much precedent for how to build the infrastructure for the instruments in the region's unforgiving environment. That meant the scientists had to learn the particulars on the fly. For example: On the great expanse of flat, barren tundra, a weather station sticks out like a sore thumb to a curious grizzly bear. "The initial stations were pretty fragile," said Frank Urban, a geologist with the USGS Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center. "So the bear and those stations--the bear won every single time without any problem.

Read More

Snowmelt, Stormwater and Contamination in Saskatoon

In Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, pollution and runoff from storms and snowmelt are getting the close look they deserve, and there’s much more to examine. Weather, from heavy spring storms to long months of snow and freezing temperatures, makes the polluting potential of runoff and snowmelt greater than and different from warmer climate cities, said Garry Codling in an email. In Saskatoon, potentially harmful elements in runoff can exceed the guidelines for runoff set by the Canadian government.

Read More