YOUNG Radiation Shields

The YOUNG 41003 Radiation Shield (universal adapter) protects temperature and/or RH sensors from error-producing solar radiation and precipitation.

Features

  • Multiple disc radiation shield
  • Blocks direct & reflected solar radiation
  • Permits easy passage of air
Your Price $146.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG Radiation Shields41003 Radiation shield, includes universal adapter for sensors up to 16mm diameter
$146.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG Radiation Shields 41003P-24 Radiation shield, includes 24mm adapter
$146.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
The RM Young 41003 Multi-Plate Radiation Shield protects temperature and relative humidity sensors from error-producing solar radiation and precipitation. Its compact size and light weight make this shield useful for many applications.

The multiple discs have a unique profile that blocks direct and reflected solar radiation, yet permits easy passage of air. The disc material is specially formulated for high reflectivity, low thermal conductivity, and maximum weather resistance. The rugged U-bolt mounting clamp attaches easily to any vertical pipe up to 2 inches diameter.

The Model 41003 employs a universal adapter to securely hold sensors up to 16mm diameter. The Model 41003P uses a special mounting adapter that can be custom sized to fit any sensor from 16mm to 26mm; specify the diameter when ordering.
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