110609

Solinst Levelogger Spare Black Top Caps

Solinst Levelogger Spare Black Top Caps

Description

Spare black top caps are compatible with the Levelogger Junior, Gold, Edge, LTC, and Barologgers.

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$19.00
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Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Levelogger Spare Black Top Caps 110609 Levelogger black top caps, pack of 10
$19.00
In Stock

In The News

Wetland water level study skips modern sensor tangle for 1930s method

Environmental sensors can measure almost any physical parameter in nature, but sometimes they can overwhelm the science they are supposed to support. Jason Hill, an assistant professor of engineering at the University of Southern Indiana, wants to create a water level model that will help wetland restorers understand and predict water level fluctuations by studying water loss through the ground and evapotranspiration. The problem is his next project site has too many variables to measure. So, he’s taking an old fashioned route based on empiricism and water level measurement. Hill said that conventional techniques for estimating evapotranspiration require site specific micrometeorological data, like solar radiation, wind speed and vapor pressure.

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Rising Atmospheric CO2 Levels Affecting Cephalopod Behaviors

Carbon dioxide, CO2, is a waste product for animals, including humans. That means that too much of it can be dangerous. In humans, excessive exposure to CO2 can kill, but in lesser amounts it can also affect the blood's pH level, causing acidemia. Acidemia can cause nerve damage , including hallucinations, delirium, and seizures. Far less is known about the subtler effects of CO2 on cephalopods, but this is in large part because far less is known about cephalopods, generally. However, new research from scientists at James Cook University (JCU) in Australia reveals that rising levels of atmospheric CO2 may cause strange behavioral effects in cephalopods—effects that are likely to be dangerous to them.

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Buoy Data Powers Muskegon Lake Hypoxia Research

Sixty years ago, the famous ecologist George Evelyn Hutchinson wrote, “A skillful limnologist can possibly learn more about the nature of a lake from a series of oxygen determinations than from any other chemical data.†Since then, oxygen measurements have only grown more relevant as the problem of hypoxia expands in lakes, oceans and estuaries across the globe.   But ecologists’ ability to measure oxygen has grown too. When Hutchison wrote that in 1957,  the “series of oxygen determinations†produced by a data buoy like the one floating on Muskegon Lake in Michigan was unthinkable.

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