Solinst Bonded Tubing Reel Assemblies

Solinst bonded tubing reel assemblies are free-standing with a convenient carrying handle. They can be made for almost any size or depth of application.

Features

  • Allow access to multiple monitoring wells
  • Free-standing with a convenient carrying handle
  • Compatible with the Model 407/408 pumps
Your Price $385.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Solinst Bonded Tubing Reel Assemblies103888 Model SC2000 1/4" bonded tubing reel assembly (up to 200 ft) for Model 407/408 pumps
$385.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model SC3000 Dual Tubing Reel Assembly 107213 Model SC3000 1/4" bonded tubing reel assembly (250 to 450 ft) for Model 407/408 pumps
$448.00
In Stock
Solinst Bonded Tubing Reel Assemblies 107844 Model SC3500 1/4" bonded tubing reel assembly (500 to 1250 ft) for Model 407/408 pumps
$1,000.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Solinst Bonded Natural LDPE Tubing Spools 109430 Bonded natural LDPE tubing, 0.17" ID x 0.25" OD, 100 ft. roll
$72.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Bonded Natural LDPE Tubing Spools 109429 Bonded natural LDPE tubing, 0.17" ID x 0.25" OD, 250 ft. roll
$180.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Bonded Natural LDPE Tubing Spools 109421 Bonded natural LDPE tubing, 0.17" ID x 0.25" OD, 500 ft. roll
$354.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Bonded FEP Lined LDPE Tubing Spools 109402 Bonded FEP lined LDPE tubing, 0.17" ID x 0.25" OD, 100 ft. roll
$202.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Bonded FEP Lined LDPE Tubing Spools 108546 Bonded FEP lined LDPE tubing, 0.17" ID x 0.25" OD, 250 ft. roll
$523.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
For less frequent sampling, and to allow access to multiple monitoring wells, even in remote locations, Solinst Model SC2000 Bonded Tubing Reel Assembly is available. The reel mounted portable units are free-standing with a convenient carrying handle. They can be made for almost any size or depth of application.
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