Solinst DataGrabber Data Transfer Device

The DataGrabber provides an inexpensive, and very portable option for Levelogger users to download data directly to a USB flash drive.

Features

  • One push-button to download data
  • Compatible with most USB flash drives
  • Connects to a Direct Read Cable or Optical Adaptor
Your Price $211.00
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Solinst DataGrabber Data Transfer Device111939 DataGrabber data transfer device, includes 512MB USB flash drive
$211.00
In Stock
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Solinst Slip Fit Direct Read to Optical Adapter 112706 Slip fit direct read to optical adapter
$65.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Threaded Direct Read to Optical Adapter 112123 Threaded direct read to optical adapter
$72.00
In Stock
Solinst Direct Read Cable Assemblies 110582 Direct read cable assembly, 5'
$84.00
In Stock

The DataGrabber connects to a Levelogger’s Direct Read Cable; alternatively, a Direct Read to Optical Adaptor allows users to connect it directly to a Levelogger’s optical end. The USB flash drive is plugged into the socket on the front of the DataGrabber.

A push-button on the DataGrabber starts the downloading process. All of the data in the Levelogger’s memory is transferred to the USB device. The DataGrabber comes with a 512 Mb USB flash drive; it is also compatible with most other USB flash drives. The Levelogger is not interrupted if it is still logging. The data in the Levelogger memory is not erased. A light changes color to indicate when the DataGrabber is properly connected, when the data transfer is taking place, and when the data has been successfully downloaded. The DataGrabber uses one 9 volt alkaline or lithium battery that is easy to replace when required.

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