Solinst DataGrabber Data Transfer Device

The DataGrabber provides an inexpensive, and very portable option for Levelogger users to download data directly to a USB flash drive.

Features

  • One push-button to download data
  • Compatible with most USB flash drives
  • Connects to a Direct Read Cable or Optical Adaptor
Your Price $213.00
In Stock
Solinst
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Solinst DataGrabber Data Transfer Device111939 DataGrabber data transfer device, includes 512MB USB flash drive
$213.00
In Stock
Solinst DataGrabber Data Transfer Device
111939
DataGrabber data transfer device, includes 512MB USB flash drive
In Stock
$213.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Solinst Slip Fit Direct Read to Optical Adapter 112706 Slip fit direct read to optical adapter
$61.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Threaded Direct Read to Optical Adapter 112123 Threaded direct read to optical adapter
$72.00
In Stock
Solinst Direct Read Cable Assemblies 110582 Direct read cable assembly, 5'
$84.00
In Stock
Slip fit direct read to optical adapter
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$61.00
Threaded direct read to optical adapter
In Stock
$72.00
Direct read cable assembly, 5'
In Stock
$84.00

The DataGrabber connects to a Levelogger’s Direct Read Cable; alternatively, a Direct Read to Optical Adaptor allows users to connect it directly to a Levelogger’s optical end. The USB flash drive is plugged into the socket on the front of the DataGrabber.

A push-button on the DataGrabber starts the downloading process. All of the data in the Levelogger’s memory is transferred to the USB device. The DataGrabber comes with a 512 Mb USB flash drive; it is also compatible with most other USB flash drives. The Levelogger is not interrupted if it is still logging. The data in the Levelogger memory is not erased. A light changes color to indicate when the DataGrabber is properly connected, when the data transfer is taking place, and when the data has been successfully downloaded. The DataGrabber uses one 9 volt alkaline or lithium battery that is easy to replace when required.

Questions & Answers
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Solinst DataGrabber Data Transfer Device Simple And Reliable For Field Work

Solinst has debuted a new device for environmental pros who need a simple and easy way to transfer data from Solinst Leveloggers. Called the DataGrabber Data Transfer Device , it is a robust and straightforward piece of tech that does what it’s supposed to do without hassle. Like the name suggests, the DataGrabber takes data off Solinst Leveloggers and transfers them via USB to memory sticks of any make. It is an alternative to the company’s App Interface device that can gather data and send them to mobile devices via Bluetooth. What sets the DataGrabber apart is that it utilizes a direct connection to make transfers and is well suited for long-term projects involving stationary Leveloggers and routine site visits.

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