Solinst USB Optical Reader

The Solinst USB Optical Reader facilitates connection to Levelogger at the office for Levelogger configuration & data upload.

Features

  • Optical reader facilitates connection to Levelogger at office for configuration & data upload
  • Low-cost communication package for direct interface to Leveloggers and Rainloggers
  • Optical reader connects directly to USB port
Your Price $151.00
In Stock
Solinst
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Solinst USB Optical Reader110149 USB optical reader
$151.00
In Stock
Solinst USB Optical Reader
110149
USB optical reader
In Stock
$151.00
The Solinst USB Optical Reader is compatible with The Levelogger Junior Edge, Levelogger Edge, LTC Levelogger Junior, and the Barologger Edge.
Questions & Answers
I am unable to load the drivers for this onto my computer. Does this reader operate on WinXP or Win7?

Yes, the Solinst USB Optical Reader is compatible with Windows XP and 7. It is recommended to have version 4.1 or newer of the Levelogger Software. This software includes the USB drivers for both XP and Windows, and can be downloaded from www.solinst.com/downloads/. The instructions for installing the optical reader can be found in the Solinst manual, under the Documents tab.

I want to download data without removing the logger from the well. Can this be done with the optical reader?

No, the logger must be placed in the dock to change settings and view data. Alternatively, you can utilize direct-read cable assemblies and PC interface cable or with the Levelogger App & Interface.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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