Tritech StarFish 452F Side Scan Sonar System

The Tritech StarFish 452F is a side scan sonar system with a unique three-fin hydrodynamic shape that dramatically improves the stability of sonar and the quality of images produced using its wide-range imaging capability.

Features

  • Produces crisper and cleaner imagery at ranges of up to 100 meters on each channel
  • Can easily be deployed and operated by a single person for real-time digital seafloor images
  • 'Plug and Play' system connects to any Windows-based PC or laptop via a USB connection
Your Price $6,925.00
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Tritech StarFish 452F Side Scan Sonar System

Overview
Based on the popular 450F design, the StarFish 452F brings even higher definition imagery to the PC. With half the horizontal beam angle (for twice the resolution) and advanced digital CHIRP acoustic technology developed from the professional underwater survey industry, StarFish 452F produces crisper and cleaner imagery at ranges of up to 100 meters on each channel (200m total swathe coverage). It competes with many larger commercial systems to produce spectacular images of the seabed and includes intuitive software with a variety of data export options.

Easy Deployment
Measuring less than 15 inches long, the StarFish 452F sonar is the smallest towed side scan sonar available. The system is independent of the boat, requiring no fixed installation and making it easy to transport and operate from any vessel. The topside controller connects to any Windows PC or laptop via USB connection for easy operation by a single person. Simply deploy the sonar by hand and tow from the boat to capture and record real-time images of the seafloor below.

  • (1) StarFish 452F Side Scan Sonar
  • (1) StarFish 450 Top Box
  • (1) StarFish 20m Tow Cable
  • (1) StarFish Power Adapter Kit
  • (1) StarFish Scanline Software CD
  • (1) StarFish User Manuals
  • (1) StarFish Peli Case
  • (1) StarFish GPS Receiver
  • (1) StarFish Pole Mount Bracket
Questions & Answers
Which side scan sonar has a better operating range?

The Starfish 990F has an operating range of 35m (115ft) per channel, while the Starfish 452F and the Starfish 450 have an operating range of 100m (328ft) per channel.

What boat speed will help me take consistent readings?

Before putting the sonar in the water, let the boat build up speed to 1-2 knots. For best results, keep the boat at a constant speed between 1-4 knots. The slower the boat speed, the deeper the sonar will tow, and the higher the resolution image will be. The recommended maximum towing speed is 8 knots (including water current flowing against the boat).

Is anything else required that does not come with my side scan sonar?

In addition to the items included with the side scan sonar system, you will need a Microsoft Windows XP/ Vista/ 7 compatible computer/laptop with 1 free USB port. You will also need a DC battery or a suitably protected AC outlet. The sonar comes with several adaptor cables for DC and AC power options.

Can the sonar be used to look at bottom sediment moving in a certain area and to map the bottom in shallow reefs/areas to look at sediment transport?

The StarFish452F provides an image of the seafloor and has been used in coral reef and shallow water applications but there are some tricks to obtaining accurate images in those settings, more on page 16 of the user guide https://www.fondriest.com/pdf/starfish_manual.pdf.

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Tritech StarFish 452F Side Scan Sonar System
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StarFish 452F side scan sonar system
$6,925.00
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