Tritech StarFish 990F Side Scan Sonar System

990F system includes towfish with 20m cable, topside controller box, AC adapter, StarFish Scanline software, GPS receiver, pole mount bracket, and Pelican carrying case.

Features

  • 1MHz acoustic chirped pulses with a 0.3 degree beam width produces defined and clear images
  • Can easily be deployed and operated by a single person for real-time digital seafloor images
  • 'Plug and Play' system connects to any Windows-based PC or laptop via a USB connection
Your Price $6,367.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Tritech StarFish 990F Side Scan Sonar SystemBP00181 StarFish 990F side scan sonar system
$6,367.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
The 990F is the ultimate high resolution StarFish side scan sonar for extreme image definition and target detection. Based on the popular and proven 450F design, the StarFish 990F uses high frequency 1MHz acoustic chirped pulses with a 0.3 degree horizontal beam width to produce the most defined and clear images from any StarFish system. With a 35m range capability on each channel (giving 70m total swathe coverage), the StarFish 990F is the ideal tool for high resolution surveys in ports & harbors, academic research, inland waterways such as rivers and canals, and SAR (Search And Recovery/Rescue) operations.

Measuring less than 15 inches long, the StarFish 990F sonar is the smallest towed side scan sonar available. The system is independent of the boat, requiring no fixed installation and making it easy to transport and operate from any vessel. The topside controller connects to any Windows PC or laptop via USB connection for easy operation by a single person. Simply deploy the sonar by hand and tow from your boat to capture and record real-time images of the seafloor below.
  • (1) StarFish 990F Side Scan Sonar
  • (1) StarFish 990 Top Box
  • (1) StarFish 20m Tow Cable
  • (1) StarFish Power Adapter Kit
  • (1) StarFish Scanline Software CD
  • (1) StarFish User Manuals
  • (1) StarFish Peli Case
  • (1) StarFish GPS Receiver
  • (1) StarFish Pole Mount Bracket
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