Stevens HydraGO-S Portable Soil Moisture System

The Stevens HydraGO-S portable soil moisture system makes soil spot sampling quick and easy. Instantly measure soil moisture, electrical conductivity, and temperature.

Features

  • Patented sensor instantly measures moisture, EC (salinity) and soil temperature
  • Integrated Bluetooth for easy operation with free smartphone app
  • Cost effective solution for portable on-the-go soil monitoring
Your Price $1,500.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Stevens
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Stevens HydraGO-S Portable Soil Moisture System93633-010 HydraGO-S portable soil moisture system
$1,500.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Cedar CP3 Rugged Handheld Computer 27880 CP3 rugged handheld computer. Includes Android 7.1.2, 6 GB RAM, 64 GB internal storage, 2-4m GPS, 16 MP front/12 MP dual rear camera, IP68 rating, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi & 4G LTE communications.
$799.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Take soil measurements anywhere for those applications not requiring a permanent soil monitoring system. Your Apple or Android device communicates wirelessly with the HydraGO using bluetooth.

Simply insert the probe into the soil, and tap the “Sample” button in the HydraMon app. The app will display soil moisture content, temperature, conductivity, and dielectric permittivity on-screen for immediate viewing. The date and time of each measurement is recorded along with the soil measurement data and the GPS location measured by your smartphone’s GPS receiver.

All data can be saved and emailed as a .CSV file for analysis in Excel. Notes and location names can be added to the data records.

The HydraGO features a rugged, engineered resin housing that contains a rechargeable battery good for a full day’s heavy use. It comes with a detachable ergonomic pole so it can be inserted without bending over.

HydraGO uses the same patented soil sensor as the HydraProbe.

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