93876

Stevens SatComm GOES Satellite Transmitter

Stevens SatComm GOES Satellite Transmitter

Description

The Stevens SatComm GOES transmitter is designed to send data via the NOAA/NESDIS GOES Data Collection System (DCS) for authorized users of data loggers and sensors used in environmental data acquisition applications.

Features

  • NESDIS CS2/v2.0 certified
  • LED indicators for quick operational confirmation
  • DCP command ready interface
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$2,395.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

The Stevens SatComm GOES transmitter sends data via the NOAA/NESDIS GOES Data Collection System (DCS) for authorized users of data loggers and sensors used in environmental data acquisition applications. The new NOAA/NESDIS CS2/v2.0 specification includes enhanced GOES transmission features and the new Stevens SatComm transmits at both 300 and 1200 BAUD data rates.

The Stevens SatComm can operate with any logger capable of exporting data packets through a serial port in any format designated by the logger and permitted by NOAA/NESDIS. The Stevens’ SatComm is easy to program using the Windows-based SatCommSet program or by menu-driven commands with any terminal program.

Auto phase calibration ensures the accuracy of each transmission. Built-in self test and failsafe functions provides communication of common anomalies that may occur (example: an improperly mounted antenna would cause poor VSWR and lower transmit efficiency).

Other features include VSWR measurements, auto transmit power levels, and GPSDO (GPS disciplined oscillator) time and frequency synchronization. A VCTCXO based frequency reference allows the Stevens SatComm to take less time to prepare for transmissions, thereby reducing the average current consumption.

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