Thermo Orion ROSS All-in-One pH Buffer Kit

ROSS pH all-in-one electrode buffer kit

Features

  • Three different pH buffers
  • Convenient, comprehensive kit
  • Includes cleaning solution and storage bottle
List Price $123.00
Your Price $114.39
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Scientific
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Thermo Orion ROSS All-in-One pH Buffer Kit810199 Orion ROSS All-in-One pH buffer kit, (1) 475mL bottle ea. of pH 4, 7, 10; storage solution; cleaning solution; storage bottle
$114.39
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion ROSS All-in-One pH Buffer Kit
810199
Orion ROSS All-in-One pH buffer kit, (1) 475mL bottle ea. of pH 4, 7, 10; storage solution; cleaning solution; storage bottle
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$114.39
Thermo Scientific Orion ROSS All-in-One buffer kit provides users with flexibility and value in the use and care of ROSS pH electrodes This convenient buffer kit comes with 4.01, 7.00 and 10.01 buffers, ROSS storage solution, cleaning solution and storage bottle.

(1) 475 mL bottle 4.01 pH buffer
(1) 475 mL bottle 7.00 pH buffer
(1) 475 mL bottle 10.01 pH buffer
(1) 475 mL bottle electrode storage solution
(1) 30 mL bottle electrode cleaning solution
(1) pH electrode storage bottle

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