Thermo Orion Meter-Attachable Electrode Stand

The Orion meter-attachable electrode stand holds electrodes in samples to simplify measurement.
List Price $180.00
Your Price $167.40
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Scientific
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Thermo Orion Meter-Attachable Electrode StandSTARA-BEA Orion meter-attachable electrode stand, includes electrode arm, holder & meter bracket
$167.40
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion Meter-Attachable Electrode Stand
STARA-BEA
Orion meter-attachable electrode stand, includes electrode arm, holder & meter bracket
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$167.40
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Thermo Orion Freestanding Weighted Base STARA-HB Orion freestanding weighted base for use with meter-attachable electrode stand
$55.43
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Orion freestanding weighted base for use with meter-attachable electrode stand
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$55.43
Questions & Answers
Can I purchase just the pH electrode holder that snaps into the end of the arm?

Unfortunately, the pH holder for the Benchtop Electrode Arm cannot be purchased separately. It only comes as a part with the Thermo Orion Star A-Series Electrode Arm.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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