Thermo Orion 475mL pH Buffer Solutions

Thermo Orion's pH buffer provides high-quality solution for easy pH electrode calibration.

Features

  • Color coded for easy selection
  • Manufactured under ISO 9000 quality standards
  • NIST traceable
List Price $23.90
Your Price $21.51
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Thermo Orion 475mL pH Buffer Solutions910168 Orion pH 1.68 calibration buffer, (1) 475mL bottle
$21.51
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion 475mL pH Buffer Solutions 910104 Orion pH 4.01 calibration buffer, color coded red, (1) 475mL bottle
$18.36
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion 475mL pH Buffer Solutions 910105 Orion pH 5.00 calibration buffer, color coded orange, (1) 475mL bottle
$21.51
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion 475mL pH Buffer Solutions 910686 Orion pH 6.86 calibration buffer, DIN standard, (1) 475mL bottle
$26.01
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion 475mL pH Buffer Solutions 910107 Orion pH 7.00 calibration buffer, color coded yellow, (1) 475mL bottle
$18.36
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion 475mL pH Buffer Solutions 910918 Orion pH 9.18 calibration buffer, DIN standard, (1) 475mL bottle
$21.33
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion 475mL pH Buffer Solutions 910110 Orion pH 10.01 calibration buffer, color coded blue, (1) 475mL bottle
$18.36
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion 475mL pH Buffer Solutions 910112 Orion pH 12.46 calibration buffer, (1) 475mL bottle
$21.51
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion's pH buffer provides high-quality solution for easy pH electrode calibration. Manufactured under ISO 9000 quality standards and color coded, this pH buffer comes in 1 pint (475 mL) size for long-lasting, accurate readings.
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