Thermo Orion ionplus Sure-Flow Fluoride Electrode

Orion fluoride ionplus sure-flow solid state combination electrode, waterproof BNC connector, 1m cable

Features

  • Sensing and reference half-cells built into one electrode
  • Sure-Flow reference junction prevents electrode clogging and provides fast and stable readings
  • Compliant with EPA testing method
List Price $969.00
Your Price $901.17
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The Thermo Orion ionplus Fluoride Electrode measures free fluoride ions in aqueous solutions quickly, simply, accurately and economically.
  • Construction: ionplus Sure-Flow solid state combination
  • Measurement Range: Saturated to 10(-6) M / Saturated to 0.02 ppm
  • Temp Range: 0 to 80 C
  • Required Reference Electrode: Included
  • Reference Filling Solution: 900061
  • Calibration Standards: 0.1 M NaF (940906) / 100 ppm F (940907) / 1 ppm F w/TISAB II (040906) / 2 ppm F w/TISAB II (040907) / 10 ppm F w/TISAB II (040908)
  • Required ISA: TISAB II (940909) / TISAB III (940911)
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Thermo Orion ionplus Sure-Flow Fluoride Electrode
9609BNWP
Orion fluoride ionplus sure-flow solid state combination electrode, waterproof BNC connector, 1m cable
$901.17
Drop Ships From Manufacturer  
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