Vaisala GMP222 Carbon Dioxide Probes

Spare GMP222 carbon dioxide probe for use with GM70 meters or GMM220 modules.
Your Price $731.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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Vaisala GMP222 Carbon Dioxide ProbesGMP222B0N0 GMP222 carbon dioxide probe, 0-2000ppm CO2 range (adjusted at 1000ppm)
$731.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala GMP222 Carbon Dioxide Probes GMP222C0N0 GMP222 carbon dioxide probe, 0-2000ppm CO2 range
$731.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala GMP222 Carbon Dioxide Probes GMP222D0N0 GMP222 carbon dioxide probe, 0-3000ppm CO2 range
$731.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala GMP222 Carbon Dioxide Probes GMP222E0N0 GMP222 carbon dioxide probe, 0-5000ppm CO2 range
$731.00
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Vaisala GMP222 Carbon Dioxide Probes GMP222F0N0 GMP222 carbon dioxide probe, 0-7000ppm CO2 range
$731.00
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Vaisala GMP222 Carbon Dioxide Probes GMP222G0N0 GMP222 carbon dioxide probe, 0-10000ppm CO2 range
$731.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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In The News

Global carbon dioxide emissions flatlined in 2014

Global carbon dioxide emissions went flat in 2014, according to The Guardian . The largest contributor to the flatline was a weak Chinese economy that looks to have canceled out emissions from strong economic growth elsewhere in the world. Still, officials with the International Energy Agency say that efforts to reduce emissions in China — like using more renewable energy sources like solar, wind and hydropower — may also have contributed to the reduction. “This is both a very welcome surprise and a significant one,” said Fatih Birol, the incoming executive director of the IEA, in a statement. “It provides much-needed momentum to negotiators preparing to forge a global climate deal in Paris in December.

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New Monitoring Site for Ocean Acidification in American Samoa

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) at the University of  HawaiĘ»i at Māno a , in collaboration with other partners, recently deployed a new ocean acidification (OA) monitoring site in Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary , American Samoa. Derek Manzello , a coral ecologist with NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) in Florida, is the lead PI of ACCRETE: the Acidification, Climate and Coral Reef Ecosystems Team at AOML. Dr. Manzello connected with EM about the deployment. “ACCRETE encompasses multiple projects that all aim to better understand the response of coral reef ecosystems to climate change and/or ocean acidification,” explains Dr.

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Extreme Wave Heights, Ocean Winds Increasing Globally

Around the world, extreme wave heights and ocean winds are increasing. The greatest increase is happening in the Southern Ocean, according to recent research from the University of Melbourne , and Dr. Ian Young corresponded with EM about what inspired the work. “Our main interest is ocean waves, and we are interested in wind because it generates waves,” explains Dr. Young. “Ocean waves are important for the design of coastal and offshore structures, the erosion of beaches and coastal flooding, and the safety of shipping.” Waves also have a role in determining how much heat, energy and gas can be trapped in the ocean. “The major reason why changes in wave height may be important is because of sea level rise,” details Dr. Young.

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