PTB210B1A1B

Vaisala PTB210 Digital Barometer

Vaisala PTB210 Digital Barometer

Description

The Vaisala PTB210 digital barometer is ideal for outdoor installations and harsh environments.

Features

  • Ideal for outdoor installations & harsh environments
  • Designed to operate in a wide temperature range
  • Corrosion-resistant housing provides protection against rain
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Details

The Vaisala PTB210 digital barometer is ideal for outdoor installations and harsh environments. It is designed to operate in a wide temperature range, and the housing provides protection against rain. The corrosion-resistant housing, along with the compact size, allows for easy installation and ensures a service-free lifetime of use. In applications where the Vaisala PTB210 will be exposed to wind, Vaisala recommends using the SPH10 or SPH20 Static Pressure Head to filter out the effect of dynamic pressure.
What's Included:
  • (1) Vaisala PTB210 Digital Barometer
  • (1) 1m cable
  • (1) RS-232 serial output
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Vaisala PTB210 Digital Barometer PTB210B1A1B PTB210 digital barometer, 500-1100 hPa, RS-232 serial output, 1m cable Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala PTB210 Digital Barometer PTB210B1B1B PTB210 digital barometer, 500-1100 hPa, RS-485 serial output, 1m cable
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Vaisala SPH10 Static Pressure Head SPH10 Static pressure head Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala SPH20 Heated Static Pressure Head SPH20 Heated static pressure head Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Questions & Answers

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Can the PTB210 Barometer interface with a computer?
Yes, all PTB210 series digital barometers can be operated through computer terminal software, such as Windows Hyperterminal. A list of commands is available in the PTB210 manual.

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