Watermark Vertical Polycarbonate Sampler Kit

For free-flushing and in-series deployments, this vertical bottle collects water samples at any depth.

Features

  • Messenger-activated release mechanism has integral cable clamps allowing samplers to be easily attached to any point on line
  • Constructed of clear polycarbonate, polyethylene and silicone
  • EPA approved for ultra-clean analysis of water, including trace metals and organics
Your Price $560.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Watermark Vertical Polycarbonate Sampler Kit77902 Vertical polycarbonate water bottle sampler kit, 2.2L
$560.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Watermark Vertical Polycarbonate Sampler Kit
77902
Vertical polycarbonate water bottle sampler kit, 2.2L
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$560.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Watermark Sampler Bottle Spare Parts Kit 78903 Spare parts for 2.2L & 5L water bottles
$120.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Spare parts for 2.2L & 5L water bottles
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$120.00
Constructed from clear polycarbonate, polyethylene and silicone, the WaterMark 2.2 liter vertical bottle is EPA approved for ultra-clean analysis of water, including trace metals and organics.

For free-flushing and in-series deployments, this vertical bottle collects water samples at any depth. It features a messenger-activated release mechanism has integral cable clamps allowing samplers to be easily attached to any point on line.

Note: In-series deployments of multiple bottles on a single line require 333g split bronze messengers with lanyards (sold separately).
  • (1) 2.2 liter vertical bottle
  • (1) 20.0m nylon cord
  • (1) Line reel
  • (1) 250g solid bronze messenger
  • (1) Plastic carrying case
Questions & Answers
Is there a possibility that the messenger will get lost during sampling?

The messenger is a brass weight with a hole through it that is threaded onto the cord (much like a large metal bead). When you are ready to take the sample, let the messenger slide down the line where it will trigger the release mechanism to close the sampler bottle. As it remains on the line once deployed (it will rest on top of the release mechanism until retrieved) it will not get lost during sampling. Care should be taken not to lose the messenger prior to sampling (don't remove it from the line while setting up or storing).

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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