Watermark Oceanographic Weighted Secchi Disc

This 51cm diameter oceanographic secchi disc comes with stainless steel hardware.

Features

  • Constructed of white high density polyethylene
  • Built-in 5 lb. lead sounding weight
  • 20m nylon cord, and reel
Your Price $250.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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Watermark Oceanographic Weighted Secchi Disc77915 Oceanographic weighted secchi disc
$250.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Constructed of white high density polyethylene, the WaterMark oceanographic weighted 51cm diameter secchi disc comes with stainless steel hardware.
  • 51cm diameter secchi disc
  • 5 lb. lead sounding weight
  • 20m nylon cord
  • (1) 51cm diameter disc with stainless steel hardware
  • (1) Built-in 5 lb. lead sounding weight
  • (1) 20m Nylon cord and reel
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