Watermark Bottom Aquatic Kick Net

The bottom aquatic kick net is perfect for qualitative sampling of benthic organisms in streams, rivers, and lake shores.

Features

  • Stainless steel rectangular frame
  • Detachable, 60" aluminum handle and deep reinforced 500 m Nitex nylon net
  • EPA approved for Rapid Bioassay Assessment Programs
Your Price $286.23
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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Watermark Bottom Aquatic Kick Net77921 Bottom aquatic kick net
$286.23
Usually ships in 3-5 days
The WaterMark bottom aquatic kick net is perfect for qualitative sampling of benthic organisms in streams, rivers, and lake shores. This net is EPA approved for Rapid Bioassay Assessment Programs.
  • 10" x 18" stainless steel rectangular frame
  • 60" aluminum handle
  • 10" deep reinforced 500m Nitex nylon net
  • (1) Stainless steel rectangular frame
  • (1) Detachable, 60" aluminum handle with stainless steel threaded attachment
  • (1) 10" deep reinforced 500m Nitex nylon net
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