Watermark Bottom Aquatic Kick Net

The bottom aquatic kick net is perfect for qualitative sampling of benthic organisms in streams, rivers, and lake shores.

Features

  • Stainless steel rectangular frame
  • Detachable, 60" aluminum handle and deep reinforced 500 m Nitex nylon net
  • EPA approved for Rapid Bioassay Assessment Programs
Your Price $286.23
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Watermark
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Watermark Bottom Aquatic Kick Net77921 Bottom aquatic kick net
$286.23
Usually ships in 3-5 days
The WaterMark bottom aquatic kick net is perfect for qualitative sampling of benthic organisms in streams, rivers, and lake shores. This net is EPA approved for Rapid Bioassay Assessment Programs.
  • 10" x 18" stainless steel rectangular frame
  • 60" aluminum handle
  • 10" deep reinforced 500m Nitex nylon net
  • (1) Stainless steel rectangular frame
  • (1) Detachable, 60" aluminum handle with stainless steel threaded attachment
  • (1) 10" deep reinforced 500m Nitex nylon net
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Swiss researchers find plastic particulate widespread in Lake Geneva

Researchers from a Swiss university found plastic particulate is widespread in Lake Geneva, according to a press release from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. The researchers sampled the lake in several ways to quantify microplastic pollution. Every sample taken for the study, whether from bird droppings, fish dissection, beach combing or a net drag had plastic particles in it. No quantity of just how much plastic is in the lake was given in the release. Further studies will evaluate plastic content of lakes and rivers across Switzerland.

Read More

New Technologies Reducing Uncertainty in Estimation of River Flow

Some of the most interesting data in the world of river and stream monitoring come at times when it's practically impossible to capture—during extreme weather events, for example. Timing alone makes capturing unusual events a challenge, and these kinds of issues have prompted researchers to use classic monitoring data along with new technologies to develop and improve hydraulic modeling for estimating river flows. Steven Lyon , a Conservation Scientist with The Nature Conservancy, Professor at Stockholm University and Associate Professor at The Ohio State University, spoke with EM about the research .

Read More

Cornell University Biological Field Station at Shackelton Point: Monitoring New York’s Largest Interior Lake for Sixty Years

Lars Rudstam, Professor of Aquatic Science at Cornell and Director of the Cornell University Biological Field Station at Shackelton Point, says that he has long held an interest in lakes in general, so naturally the Great Lakes, the largest freshwater lake system in the world, have held a fascination for him for many years. He also works on Oneida Lake, the largest lake wholly inside New York. Oneida Lake waters, traveling from the Lake to the Oneida River, then to the Oswego River, ultimately flow into Lake Ontario. “In addition to lakes in general and the Great Lakes, I have been especially interested in the impressive data series that has been collected for Oneida Lake,” Rudstam notes.

Read More