77926

Watermark Surber-Type Stream Bottom Sampler

Watermark Surber-Type Stream Bottom Sampler

Description

The surber-type stream bottom sampler is used for semi-quantitative analysis of benthic stream organisms.

Features

  • Can be used in silt or large cobble
  • Substrates are agitated to dislodge insects while water flow transports animals into plankton net
  • Heavy-duty 500 micron mesh net
Free Shipping on this product
Your Price
$500.14
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Used for semi-quantitative analysis of benthic stream organisms, this WaterMark surber type stream bottom sampler can be used in silt or large cobble. Substrates contained within the 12" x 12" folding brass frame are agitated to dislodge insects, while water flow transports animals into plankton net.

A durable Nitex mesh net is supported by perpendicular frame members and has built-in, clear polycarbonate cod-end assembly with latex tubing and pinch clamp.
Notable Specifications:
  • 12" x 12" folding brass frame
What's Included:
  • (1) 12" x 12" folding brass frame
  • (1) Nitex mesh net
  • (1) Nylon carrying bag
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Watermark Surber-Type Stream Bottom Sampler 77926 Surber-type stream bottom sampler, 500 micron mesh net
$500.14
Usually ships in 3-5 days

In The News

Plankton Portal enlists public to classify thousands of zooplankton images

Zooplankton drifts through the ocean, often ignored by the public in favor of more charismatic marine organisms farther up the food chain. A new crowdsourced project aims to change that, giving anyone a closer look at small and intricate zooplankton. PlanktonPortal.org features 900,000 high resolution images of zooplankton and tasks the public to identify them as part of data processing for a collaborative study, based out of the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Researchers hope the project will tell them more about zooplankton behavior, grouping and interaction.

Read More

DNA sequencing of insect soup shows biodiversity

Researchers in England devised a new method for monitoring biodiversity with an insect soup and low cost DNA sequencing, according to a University of East Anglia press release. Douglas Yu, a biology professor and the lead researcher for the study, said analyzing a few hundred ground-up bugs gives researchers equivalent data to traditional intensive methods for a fraction of the cost. He said, compared to high quality data sets analyzing 55,000 arthropods and birds, sequencing bug juice was just as effective. The researchers use a process called metabarcoding to identify bugs and biodiversity of an environment. The measurement could eventually be established as a low cost, low impact way to understand the biodiversity of a system through some of its smallest creatures.

Read More

Seeking an Elegant, Affordable Solution to Contamination

Dr. Charley Liberko of Cornell College's Department of Chemistry has an idea he's working to bring to fruition. “Imagine a remote village in an underdeveloped country whose only source of water is a stream contaminated with toxic levels of metal ions such as cadmium and nickel,” states Dr. Liberko. “The villagers take locally available woody plant material, soak it in potash, and heat it up for several days until the wood partially decomposes. They then filter their water through this material to remove the metal ions. When they are done with it, they put the material in a clay pot and heat it up even hotter until the organic matter decomposes completely, leaving the metal ion salts as a residue, safely in the clay pot.

Read More