Watermark Stream Drift Net

The 500 micron mesh stream drift net collects aquatic insects moving in running waters.

Features

  • 40" long Nitex net is supported open and staked to sediments
  • Sample is concentrated in a two-piece, PVC collecting bucket, lined with Nitex nylon mesh
  • Stainless steel frame
Your Price $582.81
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Watermark Stream Drift Net77929 Stream drift net, 500 micron mesh
$582.81
Usually ships in 3-5 days
The WaterMark stream drift net collects aquatic insects moving in running waters. The Nitex net is supported open and staked to sediments with 11" x 18.5" stainless steel frame. The sample is concentrated in a two-piece, PVC collecting bucket, lined with Nitex nylon mesh. The net is 40" long.
  • 11" x 18.5" stainless steel frame
  • 40" long net
  • (1) Nitex net with stainless steel frame
  • (1) Two-piece PVC collecting bucket, lined with Nitex nylon mesh
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