YSI 1001 pH (ISE) Sensor

The YSI 1001 pH Sensor provides good response times and accurate readings in most environmental waters, including freshwater of low ionic strength.

Features

  • Sealed gel reference eliminates refilling, saves time
  • Carefully designed to perform under all ionic strength conditions
  • Field-replaceable
List Price $199.00
Your Price $189.05
Stock 3AVAILABLE

Overview
The YSI 1001 pH sensor features a 'long-life' sealed gel reference, eliminating the need to refill. These sensors have been carefully designed to perform under all ionic strength conditions, from seawater with a conductivity of 53,000 uS/cm, to "average" freshwater lakes and rivers with conductivities of 200 to 1500 uS/cm, to pure mountain streams with conductivities as low as 15 uS/cm, which has historically been the most difficult medium with respect to accuracy, quick response to pH changes, and minimal flow dependence.

  • 1-year warranty
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YSI 1001 pH (ISE) Sensor
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1001 pH (ISE) sensor, Pro Series
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