YSI Pro Series Battery Cover Assembly

This replacement battery lid assembly is used on YSI Pro20, Pro30, Pro2030, ProODO, and Pro Plus handheld meters.

Features

  • Includes gasket & attachment screws
Your Price $60.15
In Stock
YSI
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI Pro Series Battery Cover Assembly116522 Battery cover assembly, Pro Series
$60.15
In Stock
YSI Pro Series Battery Cover Assembly
116522
Battery cover assembly, Pro Series
In Stock
$60.15
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