YSI 5775 DO Membrane Kit

The 5775 DO membrane kit comes standard with the purchase of many YSI DO sensors and is desired for most standard monitoring applications.

Features

  • Includes (30) 1.0 mil standard membranes, (1) bottle of electrolyte, (2) O-rings
  • Designed for use with YSI 55, 5750, 5739, 5718, & 6562 DO probes
  • Perfect for most monitoring applications
List Price $46.00
Your Price $43.70
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI 5775 DO Membrane Kit098094 5775 DO membrane kit, 1.0 mil, standard, for use with YSI 55, 5750, 5739, 5718, & 6562 DO probes
$43.70
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI 5775 DO Membrane Kit
098094
5775 DO membrane kit, 1.0 mil, standard, for use with YSI 55, 5750, 5739, 5718, & 6562 DO probes
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$43.70
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI 6035 Probe Reconditioning Kit 006035 6035 probe reconditioning kit (10 sanding discs), for use with 6562
$40.00
In Stock
YSI 5680 Probe Reconditioning Kit 060745 5680 probe reconditioning kit, for use with YSI 5718, 5739, 5750, & 55
$38.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
6035 probe reconditioning kit (10 sanding discs), for use with 6562
In Stock
$40.00
5680 probe reconditioning kit, for use with YSI 5718, 5739, 5750, & 55
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$38.00
  • (2) Booklets of (15) 1 mil membranes (30 total)
  • (1) Bottle of electrolyte solution
  • (2) O-rings
Questions & Answers
What is the shelf life on these membranes?

5775 DO membranes have an essentially unlimited shelf life as long as they are not stretched, scratched or otherwise damaged. Once they are installed on the probe, YSI recommends replacing them every 2-8 weeks depending on usage. The electrolyte solution arrives as a dry powder with an unlimited shelf life. Once mixed however, it has an expiration date of approximately two years.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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