YSI 5909 DO Cap Membrane Kit

Membrane kit for YSI 556 multi-parameter handheld meter.

Features

  • Especially well suited for low flow, profiling, and flow cell applications.
  • Can be used with the YSI 556
  • Has the lowest flow dependence at 18% and approximately 18 second response time
List Price $65.00
Your Price $61.75
In Stock
YSI
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI 5909 DO Cap Membrane Kit605307 5909 PE blue 2.0 mil cap membrane kit, 559 & 2003 polarographic sensors
$61.75
In Stock
YSI 5909 DO Cap Membrane Kit
605307
5909 PE blue 2.0 mil cap membrane kit, 559 & 2003 polarographic sensors
In Stock
$61.75
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI 5238 Probe Reconditioning Kit 052380 5238 probe reconditioning kit, for use with 5239, 85, 559, 2002 & 2003 DO probes
$33.25
Usually ships in 3-5 days
5238 probe reconditioning kit, for use with 5239, 85, 559, 2002 & 2003 DO probes
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$33.25
  • (6) 2 mil blue cap membranes
  • (1) Bottle of electrolyte solution
  • (1) Sanding disk
  • (1) Instruction sheet
  • (3) Gaskets
Questions & Answers
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