YSI 60/63 Replacement pH Electrode

Included with the purchase of a YSI 60 or 63 pH meter, the YSI 131133 pH sensor provides reliable pH readings.

Features

  • Replacement pH electrode for the YSI 60 and 63 handheld meters
  • Easily inserts into the probe module and cable assembly
  • Sealed gel reference eliminates refilling, saves time
List Price $245.00
Your Price $232.75
In Stock
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YSI 60/63 Replacement pH Electrode131133 Replacement pH electrode, YSI 60/63
$232.75
In Stock
The YSI 131133 field replaceable pH sensor is a combination electrode consisting of a glass reservoir filled with pH 7 buffer and a sealed gel reference electrolyte. The YSI 131133 pH sensor has been proven to provide long life, good response time, and accurate readings in most environmental waters, including fresh water of low ionic strength.
  • 1-year warranty
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