YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring Sonde

The YSI 600OMS V2 measures dissolved oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll, blue-green algae, or rhodamine in a low-cost package.

Features

  • Compact sonde, easily fits in 2-inch wells
  • Wiped optics and optional battery pack for long term deployments
  • Compatible with NexSens real-time data logging systems
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YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring Sonde

Overview
Designed for use in fresh, sea or polluted waters, the YSI 600OMS V2 utilizes the field-proven YSI sensors and incorporates innovations in sensor configuration such as a conductivity and temperature module that fits into the sonde body. The YSI 600OMS V2 is available with or without internal power. Its small size is perfect for applications such as turbidity or oxygen monitoring.

Optical Sensor Options (sold separately)
All optical sensors have built-in wipers that activate prior to sensor readings. Combined with depth or vented level, the 600OMS V2 is a powerful sampling tool.

  • Optical dissolved oxygen,
  • Turbidity,
  • Chlorophyll,
  • Blue-green algae (both phycocyanin and phycoerythrin), and
  • Rhodamine.
  • Medium: Fresh, sea, or polluted water
  • Operating Temperature: -5 to +50 C
  • Storage Temperature: -10 to +60 C
  • Communications: RS-232, SDI-12
  • Software: EcoWatch
  • Diameter: 1.65" (4.19cm)
  • Length: 21.3" (54.1cm)
  • Internal Power: 4 AA-size alkaline batteries
  • External Power: 12 VDC
  • Warranty: 2 years
  • (1) YSI 600OMS Sonde
  • (1) Temperature/conductivity sensor
  • (1) Soft-sided carrying case
  • (1) EcoWatch for Windows software CD
  • (1) Calibration cup
  • (1) Probe guard
  • (1) 6-Series operations manual
  • (1) Maintenance kit
Questions & Answers
How should I prepare my sonde for long-term storage?

For long-term storage, the sonde should be stored dry with the optical probe left in the port.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring Sonde
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600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity sensor
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YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring System
600-02
600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity sensor, internal battery pack
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YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring System
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600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity & shallow depth sensor
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YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring System
600-04
600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity & shallow depth sensor, internal battery pack
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YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring System
600-05
600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity & medium depth sensor
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YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring System
600-06
600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity & medium depth sensor, internal battery pack
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YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring System
600-07
600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity & shallow vented level sensor
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YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring System
600-08
600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity & shallow vented level sensor, internal battery pack
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