006130

YSI 6130 Rhodamine WT Sensor

YSI 6130 Rhodamine WT Sensor

Description

The YSI 6130 sensor provides accurate, in-situ measurement of Rhodamine WT in fresh, brackish, sea water, stormwater, and wastewater.

Features

  • Temperature compensation provides greater accuracy
  • Turbidity and chlorophyll fluorescence rejection helps eliminate interferences
  • Wiped optics field-proven for fouling prevention
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Details

In response to the need for accurate, in situ measurement of Rhodamine WT for water and pollutant tracing, YSI has developed the 6130 Rhodamine WT Sensor. The 6130 is a fouling-resistant, wiped sensor designed to seamlessly integrate - using no external interface hardware - with all YSI sondes that contain an optical port.

The YSI 6130 provides accurate, in situ measurement of Rhodamine WT in fresh, brackish, and sea water, as well as in stormwater and wastewater. The YSI 6130 Rhodamine WT Sensor rejects turbidity and chlorophyll interference. Measurement accuracy is further enhanced through correction for the effects of temperature.

The YSI 6130 sensor can be used in combination with those YSI sondes that have optical ports - 600 OMS, 6820, 6920, 6600, 6820 V2, 6920 V2, or 6600 V2 - and a YSI 650 MDS handheld display-logger. Make surface as well as vertical profile measurements. In addition, the YSI 6130 in combination with one of the YSI data logging sondes can be used for unattended continuous monitoring or integrated with data collection platforms for real-time data acquisition.
Notable Specifications:
  • Range: 0-200 ug/L
  • Resolution: 0.1 ug/L
  • Accuracy: +/-5% reading or 1 ug/L, whichever is greater
  • Warranty: 2 years
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 6130 Rhodamine WT Sensor 006130 6130 Rhodamine WT sensor with self-cleaning wiper Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Bright Dyes Rhodamine WT Dye 106023-01P FWT 25 Rhodamine WT dye, 2.5% active ingredient, 1 pint
$29.95
In Stock
YSI 6144 Optical Wiper Pad Kit 606144 6144 optical probe wiper pad kit, 20 pack of wiper pad strips
$44.00
In Stock
YSI 6624 Optical Wiper Kit 606624 6624 optical wiper kit, 2 pack, for use with YSI 6025 & 6130 optical probes
$55.00
In Stock
YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring Sonde 600-01 600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity sensor Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI 6920 V2-2 Multi-Parameter Water Quality Sonde 6920V2-01 6920 V2-2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity sensor Usually ships in 3-5 days

Questions & Answers

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How do I install my 6130 sensor?
Install the 6130 sensor in the center port, seating the pins of the 2 connectors before tightening. Tighten the probe nut to the bulkhead but be sure to not over tighten.
Will high turbidity affect my readings?
A large amount of turbidity is required to affect the readings. (100NTU will read 3Ug/L). If measuring in a highly turbid environment, an independently determined turbidity reading may want to be taken to allow for compensation.

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