YSI 6130 Rhodamine WT Sensor

The YSI 6130 sensor provides accurate, in-situ measurement of Rhodamine WT in fresh, brackish, sea water, stormwater, and wastewater.

Features

  • Temperature compensation provides greater accuracy
  • Turbidity and chlorophyll fluorescence rejection helps eliminate interferences
  • Wiped optics field-proven for fouling prevention
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In response to the need for accurate, in situ measurement of Rhodamine WT for water and pollutant tracing, YSI has developed the 6130 Rhodamine WT Sensor. The 6130 is a fouling-resistant, wiped sensor designed to seamlessly integrate - using no external interface hardware - with all YSI sondes that contain an optical port.

The YSI 6130 provides accurate, in situ measurement of Rhodamine WT in fresh, brackish, and sea water, as well as in stormwater and wastewater. The YSI 6130 Rhodamine WT Sensor rejects turbidity and chlorophyll interference. Measurement accuracy is further enhanced through correction for the effects of temperature.

The YSI 6130 sensor can be used in combination with those YSI sondes that have optical ports - 600 OMS, 6820, 6920, 6600, 6820 V2, 6920 V2, or 6600 V2 - and a YSI 650 MDS handheld display-logger. Make surface as well as vertical profile measurements. In addition, the YSI 6130 in combination with one of the YSI data logging sondes can be used for unattended continuous monitoring or integrated with data collection platforms for real-time data acquisition.
  • Range: 0-200 ug/L
  • Resolution: 0.1 ug/L
  • Accuracy: +/-5% reading or 1 ug/L, whichever is greater
  • Warranty: 2 years
Questions & Answers
How do I install my 6130 sensor?

Install the 6130 sensor in the center port, seating the pins of the 2 connectors before tightening. Tighten the probe nut to the bulkhead but be sure to not over tighten.

Will high turbidity affect my readings?

A large amount of turbidity is required to affect the readings. (100NTU will read 3Ug/L). If measuring in a highly turbid environment, an independently determined turbidity reading may want to be taken to allow for compensation.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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YSI 6130 Rhodamine WT Sensor
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6130 Rhodamine WT sensor with self-cleaning wiper
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