606131

YSI 6131 Blue-Green Algae Sensor

YSI 6131 Blue-Green Algae Sensor

Description

The YSI 6131 blue-green algae sensor monitors algal populations at natural levels in freshwater, providing an early warning for bloom conditions.

Features

  • YSI 6131 BGA Sensor is designed for freshwater (phycocyanin) environments
  • Optimized for excellent sensitivity for monitoring algal populations at natural levels
  • Insensitive to potential interferences including chlorophyll, turbidity, and dissolved organics
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Details

Blue-green algae (a. k. a. cyanobacteria) monitoring is of growing interest due to the problems some species can present through the production of toxins and compounds that deteriorate the quality of drinking water and through the formation of blooms. Blue-green algae are of interest for ecosystem studies and monitoring as well, where they may represent the most abundant primary producer. Click on the YSI 6131 Spec Sheet above to learn more about the blue-green algae sensor methodology.

The YSI 6131 blue-green algae sensor is fully compatible with all YSI 6-series sondes equipped with optical ports. YSI's optical sensors use an integrated wiping system to provide anti-fouling in the most hostile environments. Durable mechanical features include a non-corroding titanium wiper shaft, replaceable wiper shaft seal, and a new switch controlled wiper parking system to prevent mis-parking.
Notable Specifications:
  • Range: ~0 to 280,000 cells/mL; 0 to 100 RFU
  • Detection Limit: ~220 cells/mL
  • Resolution: 1 cell/mL; 0.1 RFU
  • Linearity: R2> 0.9999
  • Warranty: 2 years
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 6131 Blue-Green Algae Sensor 606131 6131 BGA (phycocyanin) sensor with self-cleaning wiper Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Bright Dyes Rhodamine WT Dye 106023-01P FWT 25 Rhodamine WT dye, 2.5% active ingredient, 1 pint
$29.95
In Stock
YSI 6144 Optical Wiper Pad Kit 606144 6144 optical probe wiper pad kit, 20 pack of wiper pad strips
$44.00
In Stock
YSI 6625 Optical Wiper Kit 606625 6625 optical wiper kit, 2 pack, for use with YSI 6150, 6136, 6131, & 6132 optical probes
$56.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI 600OMS V2 Optical Monitoring Sonde 600-01 600OMS V2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity sensor Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI 6920 V2-2 Multi-Parameter Water Quality Sonde 6920V2-01 6920 V2-2 Sonde with temperature/conductivity sensor Usually ships in 3-5 days
Additional Product Information:

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
Does my sensor need to be cleaned after deployment?
After deployment, inspect for fouling and gently clean the sensor head. Wipers may need to be replaced depending on usage.
How long can I keep my Rhodamine WT dilution?
After diluting the Rhodamine WT solution, it should be used within 5 days.

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