YSI 6560 Temperature/Conductivity Sensor

Included with virtually every 6-Series sonde, the YSI 6560 provides reliable temperature and conductivity readings.

Features

  • Titanium-encased temperature sensor
  • YSI 6560 measures conductivity via 4 pure-nickel electrodes
  • Field-replaceable
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YSI 6560 Temperature/Conductivity Sensor006560 6560 temperature/conductivity sensor
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Temperature
YSI utilizes a high-precision thermistor 2252 ohms at 25 C (+/-1%) for temperature measurement. Resistance changes with temperature and the 6-Series sondes convert resistance into C, F, or K automatically. Best of all, the temperature sensor is calibration and maintenance-free.

Conductivity
Four pure-nickel electrodes allow the YSI 6560 to accurately determine the conductivity of a sample. Along with conductivity, the YSI 6-series sonde can calculate specific conductance, salinity, resistivity and total dissolved solids.

  • Range: -5 to +50 C
  • Resolution: 0.01 C
  • Accuracy: +/-0.15 C
  • Warranty: 1 year
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