YSI 6580 pH Reference Electrode

The YSI 6580 pH Reference Electrode is a user-replaceable pH reference electrode for use with YSI 600R multi-parameter water quality sondes.

Features

  • Offers threaded connection to instrument
  • Extends the life of 6581 pH sensor
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YSI 6580 pH Reference Electrode006580 6580 pH reference electrode, for use with YSI 600R (user replaceable)
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  • (1) YSI 6580 pH Reference Electrode
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