006884

YSI 6884 Nitrate ISE Sensor

YSI 6884 Nitrate ISE Sensor

Description

Add the YSI 6884 nitrate ISE sensor to your 6-series multi-parameter instrument to complement your sampling regimen.

Features

  • Freshwater use only
  • YSI 6884 best for sampling applications
  • Field-replaceable
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Details

The YSI 6884 nitrate ISE sensor consists of a silver/silver chloride wire electrode in a custom filling solution. The internal solution is separated from the sample medium by a polymer membrane, which selectively interacts with nitrate ions.

When the probe is immersed in water, a potential is established across the membrane that depends on the relative amounts of nitrate in the sample and the internal filling solution. This potential is read relative to the Ag/AgCl reference electrode of the sonde pH probe. As for all ISEs, the linear relationship between the logarithm of the nitrate activity (or concentration in dilute solution) and the observed voltage, as predicted by the Nernst equation, is the basis for the determination.
Notable Specifications:
  • Range: 0 to 200 mg/L-N
  • Resolution: 0.001 to 1 mg/L-N (range dependent)
  • Accuracy: +/-10% of reading or 2 mg/L, whichever is greater
  • Warranty: 6 months
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 6884 Nitrate ISE Sensor 006884 6884 nitrate sensor, for freshwater use only Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI Nitrate Standards 003885 3885 nitrate standard, 1 mg/L, 500mL
$78.85
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI Nitrate Standards 003886 3886 nitrate standard, 10 mg/L, 500mL
$78.85
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI Nitrate Standards 003887 3887 nitrate standard, 100 mg/L, 500mL
$78.85
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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