YSI EcoSense EC30A Conductivity Pen

The EC30A offers accurate, low-cost measurement of conductivity and TDS (total dissolved solids) along with temperature.

Features

  • IP-67 waterproof housing
  • 1-year instrument warranty
  • Automatic temperature compensation
List Price $147.00
Your Price $139.65
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI EcoSense EC30A Conductivity Pen606121 EcoSense EC30A conductivity & temperature pen
$139.65
Usually ships in 3-5 days
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI EC30A Replacement Conductivity Electrode 606114 Replacement conductivity electrode, EC30A
$43.70
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Fondriest Environmental 1,413 uS Conductivity Standards FNCS1413-P Conductivity standard, 1,413 uS, 500mL bottle
$14.00
In Stock
YSI 580 Soft-Sided Carrying Case 605129 580 soft-sided carrying case, pH10A, ORP15A & EC30A
$28.98
In Stock
YSI Replacement Battery Pack Kit 605118 Replacement battery pack kit, pH10A & ORP15A
$4.75
In Stock

With a one-year instrument and electrode warranty, the EC30A will fit your needs for an easy-to-use conductivity, TDS and temperature instrument. The EC30A is a reusable pen-style instrument. The electrode cap is easy to replace while keeping the instrument. No throw-away instrument here!

  • IP-67 waterproof housing
  • 1-year instrument warranty
  • Automatic temperature compensation
  • User-replaceable electrodes
  • 1- or 2-point calibration
  • Clear, easy-to-read display with on-screen instructions
  • Selectable units of measure for conductivity, TDS and temp
  • Selectable or auto-raning for conductivity or TDS
  • "Hold" feature locks readings on display
  • >200 hour battery life; low battery indicator
  • Last calibration GLP record

 

  • ATC Probe:Thermistor, 10kΩ at 25°C
  • Battery:Four LR44 alkalines included with purchase
  • Battery life:200 hours or greater (low battery indicator)
  • Operating temperature range:0.0 to 50.0 °C (32.0 to 122.0 °F)
  • Warranty:1-year instrument and electrode
  • Water resistance:IP-67 waterproof case
  • Weight:105 grams (3.7 ounces) with batteries
  • (1) EC30A instrument
  • (1) Conductivity electrode
  • (4) Replacement batteries
  • (1) Instruction Manual
Questions & Answers
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What is Conductivity?

UPDATE : Fondriest Environmental is offering their expertise in conductivity through their new online knowledge base. This resource provides an updated and comprehensive look at conductivity and why it is important to water quality. To learn more, check out: Conductivity, Salinity and TDS . Salinity and conductivity  measure the water's ability to conduct electricity, which provides a measure of what is dissolved in water. In the SWMP data, a higher conductivity value indicates that there are more chemicals dissolved in the water. Conductivity measures the water's ability to conduct electricity. It is the opposite of resistance. Pure, distilled water is a poor conductor of electricity.

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Much remains unknown about sharks. The Cal State Shark Lab wants to change that

Thirty years ago, white shark sightings near California’s beaches almost never happened. For Chris Lowe, who was a graduate student at California State University’s Shark Lab at the time, spying a dorsal fin from one of the ocean’s top predators was very rare. Prior to the mid-90’s, an expansive commercial fishing operation and the loss of marine animals decimated white shark populations. If their food wasn’t being hunted, sharks were getting caught in gill nets. At that point, they would be killed anyways before getting brought to the market to be sold. Then in 1994, California residents approved propositions that banned gillnets in state waters and enacted protections for the white shark.

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