Global warming threatens California fish with extinction

By on June 12, 2013
Southern California steelhead (Credit: NOAA)

A new study from the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis suggests that salmon and other freshwater fish in the state are apt to become extinct during the next century if global warming persists, UC Davis has announced.

The study was based on a compilation of expert opinions centered on how increased temperatures might affect fish populations.

The research showed that 82 percent of the 121 native fish species present in California are likely to become extinct, while 19 percent of California’s 50 non-native fish species risk going extinct.

Increased temperatures are especially dangerous for freshwater fish that need cooler water temperatures, such as salmon and trout, as their preferred habitats are likely to be put in jeopardy.

Image: Southern California steelhead (Credit: NOAA)

About Adam Redling

Adam Redling is a contributing writer for the Environmental Monitor. He covers the latest news, studies and products in the field of environmental research.

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