AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits

AMS Hollowstem auger kits prevent contamination with a cased access hole.

Features

  • Provides the tools needed to reach a 6' depth
  • Augers cut a 3" diameter hole and have an ID of 1 1/8"
  • Hollowstem allows collection of sample through the auger
Your Price $2,696.30
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits409.80 Hollowstem Auger Kit with Drill
$2,696.30
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits 209.22 Hollowstem auger kit without drill
$1,444.80
Drop ships from manufacturer
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Hollowstem Lead Section 409.55 Hollowstem Lead Section
$610.80
Drop ships from manufacturer
The portable AMS Hollowstem auger kit provides the tools needed to reach a 6' depth. The augers cut a 3" diameter hole and have an ID of 1 1/8", making them suitable for soil, soil gas and groundwater sampling through a cased hole.

A special Hollowstem soil probe, 7/8" OD by 24" long with slide hammer is included to allow collection of a soil sample through the auger. The AMS gas vapor probes may be used through these augers telescopically. Bailers up to 1" diameter may be used to collect groundwater samples.
  • (1) Bosch Model 11245 drill
  • (1) SDS max adapter
  • (1) Slide hammer
  • (1) Flighted lead auger
  • (1) Flighted extension
  • (2) 5/8" x 3' extensions
  • (1) Hard surfaced tip
  • (1) Set of wrenches
  • (1) Nylon brush
  • (1) AMS deluxe carrying case
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