AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits

AMS Hollowstem auger kits prevent contamination with a cased access hole.

Features

  • Provides the tools needed to reach a 6' depth
  • Augers cut a 3" diameter hole and have an ID of 1 1/8"
  • Hollowstem allows collection of sample through the auger
Your Price $2,777.19
Drop ships from manufacturer
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits409.80 Hollowstem Auger Kit with Drill
$2,777.19
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits 209.22 Hollowstem auger kit without drill
$1,488.14
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits
409.80
Hollowstem Auger Kit with Drill
Drop ships from manufacturer
$2,777.19
AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits
209.22
Hollowstem auger kit without drill
Drop ships from manufacturer
$1,488.14
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Hollowstem Lead Section 409.55 Hollowstem Lead Section
$629.12
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Hollowstem Lead Section
409.55
Hollowstem Lead Section
Drop ships from manufacturer
$629.12
The portable AMS Hollowstem auger kit provides the tools needed to reach a 6' depth. The augers cut a 3" diameter hole and have an ID of 1 1/8", making them suitable for soil, soil gas and groundwater sampling through a cased hole.

A special Hollowstem soil probe, 7/8" OD by 24" long with slide hammer is included to allow collection of a soil sample through the auger. The AMS gas vapor probes may be used through these augers telescopically. Bailers up to 1" diameter may be used to collect groundwater samples.
  • (1) Bosch Model 11245 drill
  • (1) SDS max adapter
  • (1) Slide hammer
  • (1) Flighted lead auger
  • (1) Flighted extension
  • (2) 5/8" x 3' extensions
  • (1) Hard surfaced tip
  • (1) Set of wrenches
  • (1) Nylon brush
  • (1) AMS deluxe carrying case
Questions & Answers
What is a hollowstem auger?

A hollowstem auger minimizes the chance of cross contamination. The augers are capable of creating a cased borehole that is 6' deep with an inner and outer diameter of 1 1/8" and 3". Soil, gas vapor, and groundwater samples may be collected through the cased borehole.

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