409.80

AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits

AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits

Description

AMS Hollowstem auger kits prevent contamination with a cased access hole.

Features

  • Provides the tools needed to reach a 6' depth
  • Augers cut a 3" diameter hole and have an ID of 1 1/8"
  • Hollowstem allows collection of sample through the auger
Your Price
$2,696.30
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Details

The portable AMS Hollowstem auger kit provides the tools needed to reach a 6' depth. The augers cut a 3" diameter hole and have an ID of 1 1/8", making them suitable for soil, soil gas and groundwater sampling through a cased hole.

A special Hollowstem soil probe, 7/8" OD by 24" long with slide hammer is included to allow collection of a soil sample through the auger. The AMS gas vapor probes may be used through these augers telescopically. Bailers up to 1" diameter may be used to collect groundwater samples.
What's Included:
  • (1) Bosch Model 11245 drill
  • (1) SDS max adapter
  • (1) Slide hammer
  • (1) Flighted lead auger
  • (1) Flighted extension
  • (2) 5/8" x 3' extensions
  • (1) Hard surfaced tip
  • (1) Set of wrenches
  • (1) Nylon brush
  • (1) AMS deluxe carrying case
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits 409.80 Hollowstem Auger Kit with Drill
$2696.30
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Hollowstem Auger Kits 209.22 Hollowstem auger kit without drill
$1444.80
Drop ships from manufacturer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS 409.55 Hollowstem Lead Section
$610.80
Drop ships from manufacturer

Questions & Answers

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What is a hollowstem auger?
A hollowstem auger minimizes the chance of cross contamination. The augers are capable of creating a cased borehole that is 6' deep with an inner and outer diameter of 1 1/8" and 3". Soil, gas vapor, and groundwater samples may be collected through the cased borehole.

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