AMS Soil Ejectors

The AMS soil ejector snaps inside the slot of the probe and slides up as the sample enters the probe.

Features

  • Fixed ejector
  • Designed to stay inside the slot of the probe
  • Only available for 7/8" soil probes
Your Price $37.18
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Soil Ejectors402.01 Soil Ejector for 7/8" X 21" Soil Probe
$37.18
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS 402.02 Soil Ejector for 7/8" X 33" Soil Probe
$38.21
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Soil Ejectors
402.01
Soil Ejector for 7/8" X 21" Soil Probe
Drop ships from manufacturer
$37.18
AMS
402.02
Soil Ejector for 7/8" X 33" Soil Probe
Drop ships from manufacturer
$38.21
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Healthy, Diverse Soil Invertebrate Communities Mitigate Impacts Of Climate Change

You don’t have to look far to find one of the Earth’s biggest contributors of atmospheric carbon — just scoop up a handful of dirt. Microbes living in the soil release 10 times more carbon into the atmosphere than humans worldwide. This doesn’t let humans off the hook, however, as anthropogenic activity can drastically impact the rate of this emission. New research from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies reveals that healthy and diverse soil communities can mitigate the feedback effect that occurs between climate change and soil respiration. A paper detailing the findings was published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .

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Snowmelt, Stormwater and Contamination in Saskatoon

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Appalachian streams show long, slow recovery from mining’s lingering effects

Appalachia may be as closely associated with mining as it is to anything else. That close relationship will leave its mark on the area’s streams long after the last mine closes. A nine-year study recently published in Science of the Total Environment shows that long after mining activity stops and the land is left to heal, streams and stream life are slow to recover. “We could be really fine point and say that some of them seem to be recovering very, very slowly,” said Carl Zipper, professor emeritus of environmental science at Virginia Tech University . Most of the streams studied didn’t show signs of recovery.

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